SPANA

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by SPANA's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from SPANA is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.spana.org

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
15SPANA |
COMMUNITY
SPANA vet in Tunisia providing
treatment to a working horse
SPANA Chief Executive Geoffrey Dennis
with the SPANA Mali Country Director
Working animals underpin local economies around
the developing world. According to SPANA, or the
Society for the Protection of Animals Abroad, as
many as 200 million work to support a population of over 600
million people. These animals are trucks, tractors and taxis;
they transport goods to market, take children to school and
bring lifesaving water to remote communities. SPANA’s Chief
Executive Geoffrey Dennis tells
The Parliamentary Review
that
the livelihoods and sometimes the survival of so many people
depend on working animals. It is remarkable, then, that so
few of these animals have access to veterinary care; SPANA is
working to change that – to improve the lives of these forgotten
working animals and the communities they support.
First steps
In 1923, Kate Hosali and her daughter Nina set off on an extraordinary adventure
across north Africa. What they found there was to change their lives – and, in time,
the lives of many others.
Arriving in the Souks, they were struck by the sheer numbers of working donkeys,
mules and camels – many malnourished, weak and buckling under the weight of
huge loads. Returning to England, they founded SPANA.
FACTS ABOUT
SPANA
»Chief Executive:
GeoffreyDennis
»Founded in 1923
»Located in over 25 countries
»Services: Charity for working
animals and the communities
they support
»No. of employees: 350
worldwide, mostly overseas
SPANA
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | SPANA
SPANA today
Today, SPANA helps animals all around
the world, working in 25 countries last
year. To make a lasting difference to
the lives of working animals and the
communities they support, we believe
we must treat, train and teach.
Every day of the year, our teams of
dedicated vets, trainers and teachers
are easing suffering and building
a more compassionate future for
working donkeys, horses, mules,
camels, oxen and elephants.
Treat: free veterinary care
Even simple, everyday problems can be
fatal without the right care. Without
antibiotics, an infected wound can kill.
An untreated minor injury can lead to
lameness, which may put an end to an
animal’s working life. A simple tetanus
injection, costing just a few pounds, is
all it takes to stop an animal dying an
agonising death.
SPANA operates a lifesaving network
of veterinary centres around the world,
and our fleet of mobile clinics gets help
to even the most remote communities.
Train: building capacity
Where SPANA treats, we also train
– helping owners to look after
working animals properly, with care
andcompassion.
Our community trainers work around
the world to change attitudes in the
long term, preventing working animals
suffering today and for generations
tocome.
Meanwhile, SPANA also trains
professionals, improving the skills
of local vets and teachers so that
communities are better able to help
working animals in need.
Teach: fostering empathy
In some parts of the world, working
animals are considered little more
than tools, worked to exhaustion and
often pulling backbreaking loads.
These attitudes are passed on from
generation to generation.
SPANA teachers help the next
generation of working animal owners
to recognise that animals are capable
of feeling pain and have complex
welfare needs. Above all, they help
children develop compassion.
Emergency response
Drought, flooding and extreme
weather devastate communities and
regularly destroy livelihoods around
the world. When disaster strikes, those
already living a precarious existence are
the most vulnerable.
Working donkeys on
the rubbish dumps of
Bamako, Mali
To make a
lasting
difference to
the lives of
working
animals and the
communities
they support,
we believe we
must treat,
train and
teach
»SPANA IN 2018
»SPANA vets performed 376,151 treatments for sick and injured
working animals – a 21 per cent increase from 2017
»Our community trainers and vet teams helped improve the skills of
23,625 animal owners – a substantial increase from 2017
»SPANA provided humane education to more than 63,900
schoolchildren worldwide. SPANA’s education team significantly
expanded training opportunities for teachers of humane education.
»The emergency response programme delivered four new projects,
which will provide water for over 50,000 animals in desperate
need, alongside feed, training and veterinary care.
17SPANA |
COMMUNITY
SPANA works in some of the world’s
most extreme environments, helping
communities protect their animals and
prepare for the worst. When disasters
do strike, we are there, providing
emergency help to animals at risk.
Last year, for example, SPANA
completed a new project, using solar
technology to provide a steady supply
of clean, fresh water to over 15,000
animals and more than 4,000 nomadic
people in east Africa.
What makes SPANA a highly
efficient charity?
We work hard to control costs and
ensure that our interventions are
efficient and evidence based.
Analysis of the long-term impact
on the animals and communities
we support is central to all that we
do – and we make sure to adapt our
programmes accordingly.
We are currently using four impact
indicators:
»Improved welfare of animals
»Positive change in veterinary
case profiles – moving towards
a much higher percentage of
preventativecases
»Improved economic situation of
individual animal owners
»Positive behaviour changes of
owners and carers
We do occasionally highlight serious
advocacy issues, but, essentially, we
pride ourselves on being a practical,
hands-on charity, offering immediate
assistance, while always making sure we
have a long-term sustainableimpact.
Partnership is vital too, and as we
embark on the next step of our
journey, we’re reaching out to new
partners, including NGOs, corporate
and international bodies and state
agencies, including the Department
for International Development, to
ensure that our sustainable and proven
approach can continue to transform
lives for many more communities and
animals in need.
After many years working for The
International Red Cross and as CEO of
CARE International, I am very proud
and privileged to be chief executive
ofSPANA.
SPANA operates
a lifesaving
network of
veterinary
centres around
the world, and
our fleet of
mobile clinics
gets help to
even the most
remote
communities
Working camel in a brick
kiln in Rajasthan, India
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | SPANA
SPANA today
Today, SPANA helps animals all around
the world, working in 25 countries last
year. To make a lasting difference to
the lives of working animals and the
communities they support, we believe
we must treat, train and teach.
Every day of the year, our teams of
dedicated vets, trainers and teachers
are easing suffering and building
a more compassionate future for
working donkeys, horses, mules,
camels, oxen and elephants.
Treat: free veterinary care
Even simple, everyday problems can be
fatal without the right care. Without
antibiotics, an infected wound can kill.
An untreated minor injury can lead to
lameness, which may put an end to an
animal’s working life. A simple tetanus
injection, costing just a few pounds, is
all it takes to stop an animal dying an
agonising death.
SPANA operates a lifesaving network
of veterinary centres around the world,
and our fleet of mobile clinics gets help
to even the most remote communities.
Train: building capacity
Where SPANA treats, we also train
– helping owners to look after
working animals properly, with care
andcompassion.
Our community trainers work around
the world to change attitudes in the
long term, preventing working animals
suffering today and for generations
tocome.
Meanwhile, SPANA also trains
professionals, improving the skills
of local vets and teachers so that
communities are better able to help
working animals in need.
Teach: fostering empathy
In some parts of the world, working
animals are considered little more
than tools, worked to exhaustion and
often pulling backbreaking loads.
These attitudes are passed on from
generation to generation.
SPANA teachers help the next
generation of working animal owners
to recognise that animals are capable
of feeling pain and have complex
welfare needs. Above all, they help
children develop compassion.
Emergency response
Drought, flooding and extreme
weather devastate communities and
regularly destroy livelihoods around
the world. When disaster strikes, those
already living a precarious existence are
the most vulnerable.
Working donkeys on
the rubbish dumps of
Bamako, Mali
To make a
lasting
difference to
the lives of
working
animals and the
communities
they support,
we believe we
must treat,
train and
teach
»SPANA IN 2018
»SPANA vets performed 376,151 treatments for sick and injured
working animals – a 21 per cent increase from 2017
»Our community trainers and vet teams helped improve the skills of
23,625 animal owners – a substantial increase from 2017
»SPANA provided humane education to more than 63,900
schoolchildren worldwide. SPANA’s education team significantly
expanded training opportunities for teachers of humane education.
»The emergency response programme delivered four new projects,
which will provide water for over 50,000 animals in desperate
need, alongside feed, training and veterinary care.
17SPANA |
COMMUNITY
SPANA works in some of the world’s
most extreme environments, helping
communities protect their animals and
prepare for the worst. When disasters
do strike, we are there, providing
emergency help to animals at risk.
Last year, for example, SPANA
completed a new project, using solar
technology to provide a steady supply
of clean, fresh water to over 15,000
animals and more than 4,000 nomadic
people in east Africa.
What makes SPANA a highly
efficient charity?
We work hard to control costs and
ensure that our interventions are
efficient and evidence based.
Analysis of the long-term impact
on the animals and communities
we support is central to all that we
do – and we make sure to adapt our
programmes accordingly.
We are currently using four impact
indicators:
»Improved welfare of animals
»Positive change in veterinary
case profiles – moving towards
a much higher percentage of
preventativecases
»Improved economic situation of
individual animal owners
»Positive behaviour changes of
owners and carers
We do occasionally highlight serious
advocacy issues, but, essentially, we
pride ourselves on being a practical,
hands-on charity, offering immediate
assistance, while always making sure we
have a long-term sustainableimpact.
Partnership is vital too, and as we
embark on the next step of our
journey, we’re reaching out to new
partners, including NGOs, corporate
and international bodies and state
agencies, including the Department
for International Development, to
ensure that our sustainable and proven
approach can continue to transform
lives for many more communities and
animals in need.
After many years working for The
International Red Cross and as CEO of
CARE International, I am very proud
and privileged to be chief executive
ofSPANA.
SPANA operates
a lifesaving
network of
veterinary
centres around
the world, and
our fleet of
mobile clinics
gets help to
even the most
remote
communities
Working camel in a brick
kiln in Rajasthan, India

www.spana.org

This article was sponsored by SPANA. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development