St Petrocs

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by St Petrocs's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from St Petrocs is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.stpetrocs.org.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
15ST PETROCS |
COMMUNITY
The Cornish community is
inherently kind and thoughtful
with their donations
Cornwall believes that all
of its citizens should have a
place to call home
St Petrocs is working to end street homelessness in Cornwall
by providing accommodation, support, advice, training
and resettlement services to homeless people. CEO Steve
Ellis says that the charity strives to provide the highest quality of
service they can, focusing on individuals who find themselves
homeless and without provision in the county. Steve discusses
the charity’s history, and the wider issue of rough sleeping
across Cornwall.
St Petrocs was established by the Diocese of Truro when clergy found homeless
people coming to their church doors, or to their homes, asking for help. Concerned
that, at best, a bed for the night, a good breakfast, and a word of sympathy was
an inadequate response to homeless people’s underlying needs, the church took
action to set up St Petrocs.
Over 30 years later, homeless people are still coming to St Petrocs, regrettably in
ever increasing numbers. In each of the last 15 years, St Petrocs has seen an increase
in the number of homeless people accessing its services against a background of
reductions in adult social care support services provided by Cornwall Council.
The scale of the issue
In Cornwall, there is a disproportionate relationship between house prices and
salaries – the average house price is almost 11 times more than the average annual
salary in the county. Second homes, and a shortage of affordable housing stock,
has led to almost 30 per cent of the Cornish population renting, 17 per cent of
FACTS ABOUT
ST PETROCS
»Chief Executive: Steve Ellis
»Established in the 1980s
»Based in Truro
»Services: Homelessness
support and rehousing
»No. of employees: 48
St Petrocs
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | ST PETROCS
whom rent from private landlords. A
recent survey carried out by Cornwall
Community Foundation states that 72
per cent of people consider private
rented accommodation not affordable
for most people.
In the year 2018/19, 181 clients
were housed in our supported
accommodation and services at our
resource centres were utilised 23,554
times. In the same year, our Assertive
Street Outreach team met with 161
new clients, and 2,493 contacts
were made with people sleeping
rough. In each of the last seven years,
Cornwall has been found to be one
of the top ten local authority areas
with the highest number of people
sleepingrough.
Between November 2018 and February
2019, our emergency winter night
shelters provided shelter for 89 clients
over 179 nights, and over 68 per cent
of clients who used this service had
positive move-on outcomes.
The services which we now offer have
been developed over the years in
association with our partner agencies
and in pursuance of local and national
government initiatives. They are
directed not only to relieving the
immediate problems of homelessness,
but also to establishing pathways
along which, if all goes well, the
clients may progress to a settled life in
thecommunity.
On 17 November 2016, we completed
the annual count of “rough sleepers”
for Cornwall. The number of citizens
sleeping on our streets had been on
the rise, but no one in the county
was prepared for the result of the
exercise:99.
The sector and particularly those
of us working at St Petrocs were
inconsolable. We asked ourselves how
we could work so hard, utilise all our
resources and yet the figure be so
high. Nationally, the figures were up
but Cornwall was now third in the
league table, behind Westminster
andBrighton.
Cornwall is unquestionably one of the
most beautiful places to live and yet
we have so many living on our streets.
Action was required.
Responding to this crisis
St Petrocs’ response was to launch a
campaign to “end street homelessness
in Cornwall”. The campaign was
designed to raise awareness across
the county and to ask all agencies
working in the sector, all media
outlets and the general public to work
together to stop our citizens having
to sleep on the streets. As a charity,
we decided to reach out and I was
personally amazed by the offers of
support from ordinary people, both
within the county and elsewhere,
keen to drive this change.
To give the homeless a voice, an
exhibition of art, including drawings,
paintings, sculpture, poems and
photographs, toured the county,
Cornwall acts to end
our citizens living on our
streets
We asked
ourselves how
we could
work so hard,
utilise all our
resources and
yet the figure
be so high
17ST PETROCS |
COMMUNITY
stopping at schools, libraries,
shopping centres and churches.
Community groups including the
Women’s Institute, Rotary, Lions
and choirs held fundraising events
and schools, churches, Guides and
Scouts all contributed to spreading
themessage.
Politically, the six Cornish MPs
endorsed the campaign, as did
Cornwall Council. Nationally, support
was offered from Crisis, Centrepoint,
St Mungos, St Martins in the Field
andSpitalfields.
The media response, both locally and
nationally, was incredibly positive,
with articles in the written press,
social media and on radio and TV.
Extra resources were forthcoming
from government and Cornwall
Council, providing extra outreach
professionals and additional winter
night shelterspaces.
The wider Cornish community
helped identify the locations where
those sleeping outside in the smaller
towns and villages and remote
isolated places could be connected
to outreachers. Private landlords
offered accommodation for rent, in
property usually out of the reach of
thehomeless.
Progress has been made
By 2017, the number of people living
on the street was on the decrease. The
count in November 2018 saw Cornwall
bucking the trend; while the figures
remained high nationally, Cornwall had
the largest reduction in the country.
We had reduced the figure to 53,
moving us out of the top ten. To reach
this stage, St Petrocs alone rehoused
over 500 clients in 2018.
As an organisation and a county,
we are determined to end street
homelessness in Cornwall. We accept
we have much more work to do; we
need to remain committed and active
to meet our goal.
By including the local and professional
communities, having the clients inspire
us all with their personal stories
and artwork and with commitment
to continue to deliver top-class
and relevant services, our work
willcontinue.
Cornwall is a most wonderful place
to live, with a local population which
is inherently kind and thoughtful.
Ending street homelessness will make
it just that little bit more wonderful.
Thework goes on.
As an
organisation
and a county,
we are
determined to
end street
homelessness
in Cornwall
St Petrocs has worked
with the homeless
of Cornwall for over
30years
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | ST PETROCS
whom rent from private landlords. A
recent survey carried out by Cornwall
Community Foundation states that 72
per cent of people consider private
rented accommodation not affordable
for most people.
In the year 2018/19, 181 clients
were housed in our supported
accommodation and services at our
resource centres were utilised 23,554
times. In the same year, our Assertive
Street Outreach team met with 161
new clients, and 2,493 contacts
were made with people sleeping
rough. In each of the last seven years,
Cornwall has been found to be one
of the top ten local authority areas
with the highest number of people
sleepingrough.
Between November 2018 and February
2019, our emergency winter night
shelters provided shelter for 89 clients
over 179 nights, and over 68 per cent
of clients who used this service had
positive move-on outcomes.
The services which we now offer have
been developed over the years in
association with our partner agencies
and in pursuance of local and national
government initiatives. They are
directed not only to relieving the
immediate problems of homelessness,
but also to establishing pathways
along which, if all goes well, the
clients may progress to a settled life in
thecommunity.
On 17 November 2016, we completed
the annual count of “rough sleepers”
for Cornwall. The number of citizens
sleeping on our streets had been on
the rise, but no one in the county
was prepared for the result of the
exercise:99.
The sector and particularly those
of us working at St Petrocs were
inconsolable. We asked ourselves how
we could work so hard, utilise all our
resources and yet the figure be so
high. Nationally, the figures were up
but Cornwall was now third in the
league table, behind Westminster
andBrighton.
Cornwall is unquestionably one of the
most beautiful places to live and yet
we have so many living on our streets.
Action was required.
Responding to this crisis
St Petrocs’ response was to launch a
campaign to “end street homelessness
in Cornwall”. The campaign was
designed to raise awareness across
the county and to ask all agencies
working in the sector, all media
outlets and the general public to work
together to stop our citizens having
to sleep on the streets. As a charity,
we decided to reach out and I was
personally amazed by the offers of
support from ordinary people, both
within the county and elsewhere,
keen to drive this change.
To give the homeless a voice, an
exhibition of art, including drawings,
paintings, sculpture, poems and
photographs, toured the county,
Cornwall acts to end
our citizens living on our
streets
We asked
ourselves how
we could
work so hard,
utilise all our
resources and
yet the figure
be so high
17ST PETROCS |
COMMUNITY
stopping at schools, libraries,
shopping centres and churches.
Community groups including the
Women’s Institute, Rotary, Lions
and choirs held fundraising events
and schools, churches, Guides and
Scouts all contributed to spreading
themessage.
Politically, the six Cornish MPs
endorsed the campaign, as did
Cornwall Council. Nationally, support
was offered from Crisis, Centrepoint,
St Mungos, St Martins in the Field
andSpitalfields.
The media response, both locally and
nationally, was incredibly positive,
with articles in the written press,
social media and on radio and TV.
Extra resources were forthcoming
from government and Cornwall
Council, providing extra outreach
professionals and additional winter
night shelterspaces.
The wider Cornish community
helped identify the locations where
those sleeping outside in the smaller
towns and villages and remote
isolated places could be connected
to outreachers. Private landlords
offered accommodation for rent, in
property usually out of the reach of
thehomeless.
Progress has been made
By 2017, the number of people living
on the street was on the decrease. The
count in November 2018 saw Cornwall
bucking the trend; while the figures
remained high nationally, Cornwall had
the largest reduction in the country.
We had reduced the figure to 53,
moving us out of the top ten. To reach
this stage, St Petrocs alone rehoused
over 500 clients in 2018.
As an organisation and a county,
we are determined to end street
homelessness in Cornwall. We accept
we have much more work to do; we
need to remain committed and active
to meet our goal.
By including the local and professional
communities, having the clients inspire
us all with their personal stories
and artwork and with commitment
to continue to deliver top-class
and relevant services, our work
willcontinue.
Cornwall is a most wonderful place
to live, with a local population which
is inherently kind and thoughtful.
Ending street homelessness will make
it just that little bit more wonderful.
Thework goes on.
As an
organisation
and a county,
we are
determined to
end street
homelessness
in Cornwall
St Petrocs has worked
with the homeless
of Cornwall for over
30years

www.stpetrocs.org.uk

This article was sponsored by St Petrocs. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development