Talon Outdoor

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Talon Outdoor's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Talon Outdoor is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.talonoutdoor.com

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
10 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
Glastonbury organisers
have promised a
cleaner and more
environmentally-
friendly festival
ahead of their 50th
anniversary
Sustainability and the environment were
key themes of this year’s Glastonbury
festival. For the first time in the event’s
history, single-use plastics were banned
and replaced by 850 water points across
the 900-acre site and 37 WaterAid kiosks.
Alongside performances from Stormzy,
The Killers and Kylie Minogue, Sir
David Attenborough made a surprise
appearance on the final day of the
festival, congratulating the crowd for
going plastic-free.
According to statistics from Glastonbury,
one million plastic water bottles were
sold at the festival in 2017; a figure
which, in 2019, fell to zero.
Organiser Emily Eavis, daughter of the
original founder Michael Eavis, said:
“We’ve made so many positive strides
with our green campaigns this year.
It’s incredible to think that there will
be one million fewer plastic bottles for
the planet to deal with because we’ve
stopped selling them.
“The most eye-opening part of the
weekend for me was not seeing
any plastic bottles in the bins or on
theground.
“I think people are really starting to
understand how important it is to treat
the land with respect, and to stop living
a disposable lifestyle.”
Festival organisers also urged all
festivalgoers to take their tents home
as, in previous years, many had simply
left disposable tents at the site.
The “Love the Farm, Leave no Trace”
pledge, which was introduced in 2017,
saw a reported 81 per cent reduction
in the number of abandoned tents
compared to the previous year.
Following this year’s festival concluding,
Eavis tweeted that 99.3 per cent of tents
had been taken home, a significant
improvement on previous years.
Glastonbury 2019 – the greenest festival ever?
After the festival ends, a massive clean-up
operation is organised to return the site,
which was home to 200,000, to a dairy farm.
On the Monday following the festival’s
conclusion, a team of 1,300 volunteers
began to clean the area. Each volunteer
carries bin bags made from recycled
plastic, which is later recycled after the
clean-up is completed, to collect rubbish
left on the ground and in the 15,000 bins
that are scattered across the site. This
process usually takes six weeks.
In 2017, more than 60 tonnes of card and
paper, 32 tonnes of glasses, 45 tonnes
of cans and 40 tonnes of plastic bottles
were recycled. Alongside this, 132 tonnes
of food waste was converted into compost
and 4,500 litres of cooking oil was turned
into biofuel.
Roughly 40 per cent of revellers attend
Glastonbury via public transport, and since
the turn of the century, 10,000 trees have
been planted in the local area.
Next year will see the 50thanniversary of
Glastonbury. Mrs Eavis vowed: “We won’t
be slowing down for very long. We have
already started working on next year’s
50th anniversary.
“Trust me when I say we are planning a
huge celebration.”
The details of this celebration have not been
announced as
The Parliamentary Review
goes to print, but acts, agents and fans alike
are eagerly awaiting details of the largest
UK festival’s semicentennial celebrations.
11TALON OUTDOOR |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Glastonbury organisers
have promised a
cleaner and more
environmentally-
friendly festival
ahead of their 50th
anniversary
Sustainability and the environment were
key themes of this year’s Glastonbury
festival. For the first time in the event’s
history, single-use plastics were banned
and replaced by 850 water points across
the 900-acre site and 37 WaterAid kiosks.
Alongside performances from Stormzy,
The Killers and Kylie Minogue, Sir
David Attenborough made a surprise
appearance on the final day of the
festival, congratulating the crowd for
going plastic-free.
According to statistics from Glastonbury,
one million plastic water bottles were
sold at the festival in 2017; a figure
which, in 2019, fell to zero.
Organiser Emily Eavis, daughter of the
original founder Michael Eavis, said:
“We’ve made so many positive strides
with our green campaigns this year.
It’s incredible to think that there will
be one million fewer plastic bottles for
the planet to deal with because we’ve
stopped selling them.
“The most eye-opening part of the
weekend for me was not seeing
any plastic bottles in the bins or on
theground.
“I think people are really starting to
understand how important it is to treat
the land with respect, and to stop living
a disposable lifestyle.”
Festival organisers also urged all
festivalgoers to take their tents home
as, in previous years, many had simply
left disposable tents at the site.
The “Love the Farm, Leave no Trace”
pledge, which was introduced in 2017,
saw a reported 81 per cent reduction
in the number of abandoned tents
compared to the previous year.
Following this year’s festival concluding,
Eavis tweeted that 99.3 per cent of tents
had been taken home, a significant
improvement on previous years.
Glastonbury 2019 – the greenest festival ever?
After the festival ends, a massive clean-up
operation is organised to return the site,
which was home to 200,000, to a dairy farm.
On the Monday following the festival’s
conclusion, a team of 1,300 volunteers
began to clean the area. Each volunteer
carries bin bags made from recycled
plastic, which is later recycled after the
clean-up is completed, to collect rubbish
left on the ground and in the 15,000 bins
that are scattered across the site. This
process usually takes six weeks.
In 2017, more than 60 tonnes of card and
paper, 32 tonnes of glasses, 45 tonnes
of cans and 40 tonnes of plastic bottles
were recycled. Alongside this, 132 tonnes
of food waste was converted into compost
and 4,500 litres of cooking oil was turned
into biofuel.
Roughly 40 per cent of revellers attend
Glastonbury via public transport, and since
the turn of the century, 10,000 trees have
been planted in the local area.
Next year will see the 50thanniversary of
Glastonbury. Mrs Eavis vowed: “We won’t
be slowing down for very long. We have
already started working on next year’s
50th anniversary.
“Trust me when I say we are planning a
huge celebration.”
The details of this celebration have not been
announced as
The Parliamentary Review
goes to print, but acts, agents and fans alike
are eagerly awaiting details of the largest
UK festival’s semicentennial celebrations.
Managing Partner Nick Mawditt
Talon’s charity team announce their
fundraising success at Talon’s sixth
birthday party
Talon Outdoor is an independent out-of-home (OOH)
media specialist and a significant player in the OOH
agency sector with a focus on delivering smarter, creative,
technology-led and integrated OOH communications. It handles
the OOH media for several of the UK’s leading advertising
brands, through our partnerships with Omnicom Media Group
UK agencies, Havas Media Group, AMS Media Group, JAA,
Goodstuff, Ptarmigan Media and Republic of Media. Managing
Partner Nick Mawditt tells
The Parliamentary Review
more.
Created in 2013, we have developed strong standards of media planning, buying,
creative excellence and technology-led foundations. Founding Partners Eric Newham,
as well as joint Managing Directors Frank Bryant and James Copley, are still with the
business and committed to growth and expansion, with Global CEO Barry Cupples
joining recently from Omnicom. We have offices in London, Manchester, New York,
San Diego and five other US cities, plus network contacts in South America, Europe
and Asia. Following six years of outstanding growth and success in the UK, we are
now transporting our award-winning OOH planning and buying skillset into global
markets, as well as transforming how we use data and technology. Our people-first
culture means we aim to employ smart, enthusiastic and driven individuals who are
committed to playing their part in the success ofTalon.
In our short time in business, Talon has achieved the top people accolade by being
ranked number one in the prestigious and highly contested Top 100 Best Small
Companies List, run by
The Sunday Times
. This followed an initial top ten placing.
We have also been recognised as
Campaign Magazine
Best Places to Work in
FACTS ABOUT
TALON OUTDOOR
»Joint Managing Directors:
Frank Bryant and James Copley
»Managing Partner: Nick Mawditt
»Founded in 2013
»Based in London
»Services: OOH media planning,
buying and measurement
»No. of employees: 150
Talon Outdoor
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
12 | TALON OUTDOOR
Advertising as number one Medium-
sized UK Company and have also
featured in the
Sunday Times
Fast
Track 100 and Profit Track 100 as well
as the London Stock Exchange’s 1000
Companies to Inspire Britain.
The awards came after much dedication
towards culture initiatives at Talon; from
the refinement of working practices, to
improving the work-life balance of staff
members and to creating a positive
and open company culture for all. We
are committed to placing our people
at the heart of our business. We have
introduced wellbeing initiatives such as
flexible working and additional leave,
plus a no-email policy after 7pm.
Smarter as Standard
Our work remains central to our
success, with a creative, insight and
data-led approach to planning and
buying OOH campaigns that amplify
and deliver effective advertising
communications and content for
brands. We position this approach as
“Smarter as Standard”. This means
taking the best of digital advertising
techniques and applying them to
OOH. Delivering Smarter as Standard
means a shift towards data-driven
campaign planning, dynamic creative,
automated execution and outcome-
basedmeasurement.
The industry has invested in better,
higher-quality, data-active and more
impactful screens – which now
account for half the £1.2 billion OOH
revenues. This adds to the medium’s
potential and retains the characteristics
of high broadcast reach and impactful
messages to large numbers of
people in urban, shopping and
commuterenvironments.
We have developed an OOH
Smarter
as Standard
manifesto of our beliefs
about the future of OOH and the path
we have taken to ensure it keeps on
working for our clients. Technology,
data and automation are at the heart
of this transformation.
These feature a clear position around
automation, data, context and the
integration of digital, which have
informed the development of our
technology platforms, Plato and Ada.
We are applying this philosophy as we
expand globally, seeking to design and
executing data-driven, technology-led
integrated outdoor campaigns that
produce measurable results andimpact.
Responding to change
A number of themes are driving
developments in our industry this year.
The arrival of media group Global,
genuine advancements in the use
of technology, wider access and use
of location data, and the potential
for integration of digital and motion
content are stimulating antidotes to
political intrigue and social media woes
as brands seek ongoing reassurance
from their ad activity in changingtimes.
We can expect the following factors to
make a significant difference in 2019,
including consolidation, convergence,
politics, brand trust, the experience
economy, data, technology and growth.
This narrative is expected to maintain
the momentum and progress we’ve
experienced in 2018, characterised by
growth, investment, expansion and
2019 Campaign Media
Award winning digital
campaign for Hiscox
We are now
transporting
our award-
winning OOH
business into
global
markets, as
well as
transforming
how we use
data and
technology
13TALON OUTDOOR |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
huge change. Genuine initiatives and
insights around the OOH opportunity
such as the convergence of social media
video content will enhance brands’
emotion-led strategies, particularly
connecting with younger audiences.
The impact of politics, the rise of fake
news and online brand safety will ensure
branding and reassurance remain top
priorities for businesses seeking to re-
engage with audiences. Brands will seek
out the channels best placed to deliver
stronger messages. These include OOH
with its broadcast reach appeal.
In automation and data, new strategies
around location and measurement
will make OOH more accountable
and location more important in
planning and demonstrating return.
Data will make smarter location
planning supersede a universal drive
to automation. Greater collaboration
around fundamental measurables like
availability and playout reporting are
now being accelerated and delivered
in line with the OOH industry trends
for consolidation and convergence. In
fact, the maturity of digital is enabling
better optimisation strategies and the
industry is driving channel strategies
where share of time changes and data-
led location planning strategies are
enabling longer campaign durations
and greater efficiencies – more
impacts, more coverage.
The bottom line is an encouraging
outlook for Talon and OOH that beats
our previous optimism. Digital growth,
consolidation and further investment
means OOH is now being talked about
as a more dynamic channel. Rush hour
is the new primetime
– referencing
the revenue-generating element of TV
advertising
but without the audience
inflation and fragmentation affecting
other channels.
Major aesthetic improvements to
roadside, city centres and transport
and shopping environments are driving
growth forecasts and more creativity.
But it is the progress we are seeing
in the use of data, measured location
planning and accountable automation
that defines the transformation factors
that will keep OOH relevant in times of
external change and uncertainty.
The impact of
politics, fake
news and online
brand safety will
ensure branding
and reassurance
remain top
priorities for
businesses
seeking to re-
engage with
audiences
Big Mac on the big
screen – the IMAX
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
12 | TALON OUTDOOR
Advertising as number one Medium-
sized UK Company and have also
featured in the
Sunday Times
Fast
Track 100 and Profit Track 100 as well
as the London Stock Exchange’s 1000
Companies to Inspire Britain.
The awards came after much dedication
towards culture initiatives at Talon; from
the refinement of working practices, to
improving the work-life balance of staff
members and to creating a positive
and open company culture for all. We
are committed to placing our people
at the heart of our business. We have
introduced wellbeing initiatives such as
flexible working and additional leave,
plus a no-email policy after 7pm.
Smarter as Standard
Our work remains central to our
success, with a creative, insight and
data-led approach to planning and
buying OOH campaigns that amplify
and deliver effective advertising
communications and content for
brands. We position this approach as
“Smarter as Standard”. This means
taking the best of digital advertising
techniques and applying them to
OOH. Delivering Smarter as Standard
means a shift towards data-driven
campaign planning, dynamic creative,
automated execution and outcome-
basedmeasurement.
The industry has invested in better,
higher-quality, data-active and more
impactful screens – which now
account for half the £1.2 billion OOH
revenues. This adds to the medium’s
potential and retains the characteristics
of high broadcast reach and impactful
messages to large numbers of
people in urban, shopping and
commuterenvironments.
We have developed an OOH
Smarter
as Standard
manifesto of our beliefs
about the future of OOH and the path
we have taken to ensure it keeps on
working for our clients. Technology,
data and automation are at the heart
of this transformation.
These feature a clear position around
automation, data, context and the
integration of digital, which have
informed the development of our
technology platforms, Plato and Ada.
We are applying this philosophy as we
expand globally, seeking to design and
executing data-driven, technology-led
integrated outdoor campaigns that
produce measurable results andimpact.
Responding to change
A number of themes are driving
developments in our industry this year.
The arrival of media group Global,
genuine advancements in the use
of technology, wider access and use
of location data, and the potential
for integration of digital and motion
content are stimulating antidotes to
political intrigue and social media woes
as brands seek ongoing reassurance
from their ad activity in changingtimes.
We can expect the following factors to
make a significant difference in 2019,
including consolidation, convergence,
politics, brand trust, the experience
economy, data, technology and growth.
This narrative is expected to maintain
the momentum and progress we’ve
experienced in 2018, characterised by
growth, investment, expansion and
2019 Campaign Media
Award winning digital
campaign for Hiscox
We are now
transporting
our award-
winning OOH
business into
global
markets, as
well as
transforming
how we use
data and
technology
13TALON OUTDOOR |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
huge change. Genuine initiatives and
insights around the OOH opportunity
such as the convergence of social media
video content will enhance brands’
emotion-led strategies, particularly
connecting with younger audiences.
The impact of politics, the rise of fake
news and online brand safety will ensure
branding and reassurance remain top
priorities for businesses seeking to re-
engage with audiences. Brands will seek
out the channels best placed to deliver
stronger messages. These include OOH
with its broadcast reach appeal.
In automation and data, new strategies
around location and measurement
will make OOH more accountable
and location more important in
planning and demonstrating return.
Data will make smarter location
planning supersede a universal drive
to automation. Greater collaboration
around fundamental measurables like
availability and playout reporting are
now being accelerated and delivered
in line with the OOH industry trends
for consolidation and convergence. In
fact, the maturity of digital is enabling
better optimisation strategies and the
industry is driving channel strategies
where share of time changes and data-
led location planning strategies are
enabling longer campaign durations
and greater efficiencies – more
impacts, more coverage.
The bottom line is an encouraging
outlook for Talon and OOH that beats
our previous optimism. Digital growth,
consolidation and further investment
means OOH is now being talked about
as a more dynamic channel. Rush hour
is the new primetime
– referencing
the revenue-generating element of TV
advertising
but without the audience
inflation and fragmentation affecting
other channels.
Major aesthetic improvements to
roadside, city centres and transport
and shopping environments are driving
growth forecasts and more creativity.
But it is the progress we are seeing
in the use of data, measured location
planning and accountable automation
that defines the transformation factors
that will keep OOH relevant in times of
external change and uncertainty.
The impact of
politics, fake
news and online
brand safety will
ensure branding
and reassurance
remain top
priorities for
businesses
seeking to re-
engage with
audiences
Big Mac on the big
screen – the IMAX

www.talonoutdoor.com

This article was sponsored by Talon Outdoor. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster