Tapestry

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Tapestry's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Tapestry is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.tapestry-uk.org

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | TAPESTRY
Heading home after an
enjoyable day
Enjoying a freshly cooked
meal with friends
According to Tapestry Care UK Limited’s CEO Anthony
Lowe, adult social care is in crisis. He says that what we
have isn’t working, and believes the entire country needs
a radical new approach. Tapestry, he tells
The Parliamentary
Review
, is a social business offering a sustainable, deliverable
and effective solution. However, Anthony says social businesses
face a problem: often they find themselves struggling in the
marketplace and are sometimes forced out entirely.
Caring for the growing numbers of older people and those living longer with
disability and dementia will prove to be one of the biggest challenges for 21st-
century Britain.
Providing prevention-focused, affordable, personalised and integrated care presents
an even greater challenge at present. We hope to ensure people can live healthy,
connected and fulfilling lives in their communities, which is what society wants
andneeds.
Making this care and support available, therefore, is very important to individuals,
and is equally important to our society as a whole.
Quite simply, if people do not get the support that they need, they can quickly
require the support of expensive primary and secondary healthcare services, which
are already under budgetary and operational pressure.
FACTS ABOUT
TAPESTRY
»Managing Director:
AnthonyLowe
»Founded in 1949
»Located in Hornchurch
»Services: Caring for the
growing numbers of older
people and those with
disabilities
»No. of employees: 82
Tapestry
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | TAPESTRY
Heading home after an
enjoyable day
Enjoying a freshly cooked
meal with friends
According to Tapestry Care UK Limited’s CEO Anthony
Lowe, adult social care is in crisis. He says that what we
have isn’t working, and believes the entire country needs
a radical new approach. Tapestry, he tells
The Parliamentary
Review
, is a social business offering a sustainable, deliverable
and effective solution. However, Anthony says social businesses
face a problem: often they find themselves struggling in the
marketplace and are sometimes forced out entirely.
Caring for the growing numbers of older people and those living longer with
disability and dementia will prove to be one of the biggest challenges for 21st-
century Britain.
Providing prevention-focused, affordable, personalised and integrated care presents
an even greater challenge at present. We hope to ensure people can live healthy,
connected and fulfilling lives in their communities, which is what society wants
andneeds.
Making this care and support available, therefore, is very important to individuals,
and is equally important to our society as a whole.
Quite simply, if people do not get the support that they need, they can quickly
require the support of expensive primary and secondary healthcare services, which
are already under budgetary and operational pressure.
FACTS ABOUT
TAPESTRY
»Managing Director:
AnthonyLowe
»Founded in 1949
»Located in Hornchurch
»Services: Caring for the
growing numbers of older
people and those with
disabilities
»No. of employees: 82
Tapestry
33TAPESTRY |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
The cost of continuing
As we age, we recognise that to
continue to do the things we want to
and to live independently at home, we
will eventually need support. There is
also a growing understanding of the
cost of this.
Our hope is for future generations to
develop an understanding that will
ensure individuals put financial plans
in place for future care needs, and that
the government takes action to ensure
that they are able to do so.
However, we have a significant
challenge today, which will only
increase over the next ten years.
There are already a large number of
individuals who require support and
do not have the necessary financial
resources to fully pay for it.
The burden is therefore falling on
other individuals, such as carers and
families, who are having to find money
to pay for these services. Local councils
also have to secure the money through
increased local taxation or through
a reallocation of existing resources.
This is forcing councils to make some
very hard decisions. It is therefore
extremely important that solutions to
this growing challenge are affordable
and cost effective for individuals and
councils alike, as well as financially
self-sustaining.
We are concerned that the
forthcoming social care green paper
will not be radical enough and, as a
result, grants and a more one-size-
fits-all approach, delivered by national
brands, will be seen as a quick fix.
Historically, the voluntary sector has
been largely funded by grants. In my
opinion and experience, grants are
often unsustainable and have little
impact. We feel they are not a good
use of public money.
National organisations delivering the
same generic solution, in different
locations, does not work either, as it
does not take into account the diversity
of the local population, nor the local
community’s needs.
Social businesses
We believe that the solution is to
use local social businesses in order
to deliver affordable services. Social
businesses generate their own income
streams and make profits that are
automatically reinvested into improving
their service quality or growing to
support more people.
They are, therefore, financially self-
sustaining and do not rely on grants
or public generosity to provide the
prevention-based care services required
to ensure that people are able to live
healthy, connected and fulfilled lives
both at home and in the community.
We believe that local social businesses
are also more effective for a number
ofreasons.
Most importantly, a local organisation
understands its community and can
be flexible in its service provision.
This means that the local model does
not duplicate services or provide Enjoying activities in
the dementia friendly
garden
We hope to
ensure people
can live
healthy,
connected
and fulfilling
lives in their
communities,
which is what
society wants
and needs
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
34 | TAPESTRY
unnecessary competition. Instead
it works to identify current service
provision and seeks to complement
those services by working with
the organisations, rather than in
competition with them.
This flexibility also allows the
organisation to utilise existing
infrastructure and to work locally in
finding innovative solutions to deliver
services that would otherwise not
befeasible.
National generic models lack this
flexibility and thus do not deliver as
effective an outcome, making them
far less cost effective. National models
can also duplicate services, create
unnecessary competition and, in the
worst-case scenario, put effective,
locally based organisations out
ofbusiness.
Social business models, like Tapestry,
which works across east Essex and
London, already exist but are facing
challenges due to the fact that our
value has not yet been recognised.
Opportunities to thrive
To thrive, we do not need grant
funding. We need opportunities to
secure investment to allow us to scale
up and deliver greater social impact.
This will enable us to achieve outcomes
locally that will improve lives and
reduce the pressure on primary and
secondary care services.
We need to be recognised as an
existing company in the marketplace
and valued as a delivery method. Too
often our impact is overlooked because
we are not well known outside of
our local environments and we do
not have the resources to generate a
national profile like charities with more
powerful brands.
Most importantly, we need equal
opportunity in the marketplace.
Experience has shown that the
processes used to tender for contracts
is weighted in favour of larger
organisations. I am sure that this is
unintentional and arises from a lack
of understanding, but the process
does limit the ability of smaller social
businesses to secure contracts. More
importantly, this lack of awareness
results in the funding of bigger
organisations to provide unnecessary,
competitive, duplicate services in the
local market.
Our challenge, therefore, is for national
and local government to recognise that
we exist and to encourage them to talk
to us. We can then demonstrate how
we can effectively deliver cost-effective
and high-quality services that people
value and achieve the outcomes
theywant.
We believe
that the
solution is to
use local social
businesses in
order to
deliver
affordable
services
Tapestry’s first
community hub,
HOPWA House,
providing care, support
and companionship
since 1965

www.tapestry-uk.org

This article was sponsored by Tapestry. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development