Tate Consulting

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Tate Consulting's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Tate Consulting is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.tateconsulting.eu

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | OXFORD ENGINEERING
outsource processes are continuous.
They are achieving significant results
in terms of cost, deliveries and
qualityperformance.
Launched in 2015 with two intakes per
year, our apprentice training programme
has been a huge success. Originally
open to machinists, now it is being
further developed to include welders
and technicians. The success of the
programme has been recognised by one
of our apprentices winning the runner-
up award at the National Apprentice
Awards. Beyond this, a key global
customer has requested an exchange
programme which we will enter into in
2019. As a member of the Cranfield 50,
our managing director provides guidance
and feedback for the students. He has
assisted them with the development of
their ideas and helped them to build
their entrepreneurial confidence.
Manufacturing faces many global
challenges and we have turned our
focus towards high added value,
knowledge-based and sustainable
manufacturing. Together with our
customers, we are at the vanguard
of these changes and are supporting
them with design, experience and
change management. We are always
wary of embracing fads, as they often
add complexity and reduce innovation.
Instead, we focus on manufacturing
ever better and more cost-effective
products for our customers.
Notwithstanding the challenges of
Brexit, the company will continue with
its priority of retaining and training
staff to the highest known standards.
Looking ahead, we are aiming to
develop a group approach towards
growth and to work with our
customers to increase the value they
receive from our services. While
boosting capital investment is not a
total solution for improved productivity,
we are conducting a group review of
our capital equipment capabilities. We
are looking into the development of
new technology, software, processes
and ideas. To ensure we balance
growth with profit, we are hoping
to reduce the cost of manufacturing
and improve efficiencies, hence
securing our employees’ livelihood in a
sustainable and ethical way.
Launched in
2015 with
two intakes
per year, our
apprentice
training
programme
has been a
huge success
In the end, it’s all about
people
19TATE CONSULTING |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Director Shane Tate
Lexington Princes Dock
development, Liverpool
With offices in Leeds and London, Tate Consulting is an
industry-leading building services engineering company
that provides a strategic and innovative approach
in delivering a wide range of engineering and management
consultancy services. Its reputation has been built on its designs
of low-carbon buildings, which help create environments that
improve the quality of health and wellbeing experienced by their
inhabitants. Director Shane Tate tells
TheParliamentary Review
more about its range of services.
Having built up an impressive billion-pound portfolio of work that spans every
market sector, including residential, industrial and commercial, our teams enable us
to secure contracts and joint ventures with some of the biggest commercial brands
and large-scale development projects across the country.
Health and wellbeing
As engineers, we take global responsibility very seriously and our ethos is to use
technology and innovation to minimise the impact on the environment while
providing an efficient and cost-effective service using renewable energy and
sustainable practices. By using building data and technology, designers now have
the ability to eliminate sick building syndrome, or SBS, a term used to describe
how building occupants experience acute health problems and discomfort, which
is linked to a building’s environment. The symptoms associated with SBS can
include headaches, nausea and fatigue, as well as eye, nose or throat discomfort.
Prolonged exposure can also cause chronic health problems like asthma and other
FACTS ABOUT
TATE CONSULTING
»Director: Shane Tate
»Founded in 2003
»Based in Leeds and London
»Services: Building services
engineering
»No. of employees: 25
Tate Consulting
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
20 | TATE CONSULTING
respiratory issues in children as a result
of damp and mouldy places caused
by inadequate building ventilation.
Improving natural and artificial lighting,
thermal comfort, air quality, acoustics
and natural ventilation are just some
of the ways that can help create an
environment proven to have a positive
impact on health and wellbeing.
With the use of advanced technology
and by creating smart buildings we
can help alleviate these problems
by automatically managing and
maintaining the indoor air quality by
using odour and humidity sensors.
In addition, Tate Consulting are
designing-in graphical interface
touchscreen technology to enable
occupiers to access their own data
and insight to help them operate
the building and control energy
consumption. We understand that
good design, incorporating health
and wellbeing, in turn leads to a
lower tenant turnover, which is good
for long-term security of tenure and
provides a more stabilised income yield
for investors.
Digital technology
Another important part of improving
productivity, quality outcomes and
stakeholder financial return is the use
of digital technology to generate data
and develop insight and innovation
in building design and construction.
Through the use of technology,
building designs can be worked on
collaboratively instead of teams working
individually. This team collaboration
enables a more co-ordinated building
design and means less disruption and
downtime on construction sites, which
ultimately helps to reduce labour input
on site and improves productivity.
The benefits of using building
information modelling technology,
also known as BIM, is that all the
co-ordination and interfaces between
different disciplines can be undertaken
in the predevelopment phase to avoid
costly time and issues on site. It also
enables high-quality information to
be handed over to building operators
and maintenance teams at completion
so that the building design principles,
Gulfstream Aerospace
Corporation’s new
service centre at TAG
Farnborough Airport
We take global
responsibility
very seriously
and use
technology and
innovation to
minimise the
impact on the
environment
while providing
an efficient and
cost-effective
service using
sustainable
practices
21TATE CONSULTING |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
asset schedules and specifications are
available throughout the remaining
90 per cent of the building’s life
cycle. This ensures that key features,
like low energy in-use and reduced
maintenance labour input costs
are achieved, increasing the overall
productivity in construction as well
as playing a vital role in reducing fuel
poverty and increasing energy security
for our country.
Tate Consulting used BIM technology
on the Royal Wharf project, comprising
2,000 apartments as part of a £3.5
billion regeneration scheme to create
a new community in the Docklands
area of London. Our fabric-first
philosophy, to minimise energy use
before offsetting via renewables,
allowed an overall reduction in carbon
emissions of between 40 and 50
per cent compared with building
regulations’ minimum standards. In
addition, 900 affordable housing
units at Royal Wharf were constructed
using off-site construction and
prefabrication methods, which has
substantial environmental, societal,
economic, time, quality and health
and safety benefits. This approach has
been shown by research conducted
at Cambridge University to reduce
energy use in construction by 80 per
cent, building operation by 25 per cent
and to contribute to a reduction of 60
per cent in vehicle movements when
compared with traditional techniques,
which often result in a greater number
of small deliveries.
Harnessing technology and
skills
One of the main challenges within the
industry is the need to embrace the
benefits of technology. Smart buildings
can present real opportunities to
optimise the planning and usage of
a building, and help to make the
building run more intelligently and
efficiently, to improve living, working
and leisure environments andto create
a unique building experience tailored
to individual needs. But technology
developments within our sector are still
largely a new and unfamiliar inclusion
for the majority of contractors, so
thereis a need to educate contractors
and clients of the benefits, as well
as to address the disadvantages and
realistic limitations of smart technology
systems to ensure we achieve a safe
and secure cyber environment.
Another problem within engineering
is staff shortage, and disappointingly
it’s still a much more male-orientated
sector, with just 12 per cent of
engineers being women, something
the industry needs to actively help
change. More needs to be done
to educate young people on the
marketability and benefits of a career
in engineering, but for real change
to happen, this problem needs to
be tackled within early education to
push science, technology, engineering
and mathematics industries. At Tate
Consulting our business culture
emphasises ongoing professional
development by creating a workplace
that allows positivity and productivity
to flourish. As a company, if we can
help change the industry work culture
today, we’re hopefully attracting and
retaining talent and inspiring millennials
to solve tomorrow’sproblem s.
Smart buildings
can present
opportunities to
optimise the
planning and
usage of a
building and
help to make
the building run
more intelligently
and efficiently,
to improve
environments
and to create a
unique building
experience
tailored to
individual
needs
Creating a new district
with residential and
retail space in London’s
Docklands
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
20 | TATE CONSULTING
respiratory issues in children as a result
of damp and mouldy places caused
by inadequate building ventilation.
Improving natural and artificial lighting,
thermal comfort, air quality, acoustics
and natural ventilation are just some
of the ways that can help create an
environment proven to have a positive
impact on health and wellbeing.
With the use of advanced technology
and by creating smart buildings we
can help alleviate these problems
by automatically managing and
maintaining the indoor air quality by
using odour and humidity sensors.
In addition, Tate Consulting are
designing-in graphical interface
touchscreen technology to enable
occupiers to access their own data
and insight to help them operate
the building and control energy
consumption. We understand that
good design, incorporating health
and wellbeing, in turn leads to a
lower tenant turnover, which is good
for long-term security of tenure and
provides a more stabilised income yield
for investors.
Digital technology
Another important part of improving
productivity, quality outcomes and
stakeholder financial return is the use
of digital technology to generate data
and develop insight and innovation
in building design and construction.
Through the use of technology,
building designs can be worked on
collaboratively instead of teams working
individually. This team collaboration
enables a more co-ordinated building
design and means less disruption and
downtime on construction sites, which
ultimately helps to reduce labour input
on site and improves productivity.
The benefits of using building
information modelling technology,
also known as BIM, is that all the
co-ordination and interfaces between
different disciplines can be undertaken
in the predevelopment phase to avoid
costly time and issues on site. It also
enables high-quality information to
be handed over to building operators
and maintenance teams at completion
so that the building design principles,
Gulfstream Aerospace
Corporation’s new
service centre at TAG
Farnborough Airport
We take global
responsibility
very seriously
and use
technology and
innovation to
minimise the
impact on the
environment
while providing
an efficient and
cost-effective
service using
sustainable
practices
21TATE CONSULTING |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
asset schedules and specifications are
available throughout the remaining
90 per cent of the building’s life
cycle. This ensures that key features,
like low energy in-use and reduced
maintenance labour input costs
are achieved, increasing the overall
productivity in construction as well
as playing a vital role in reducing fuel
poverty and increasing energy security
for our country.
Tate Consulting used BIM technology
on the Royal Wharf project, comprising
2,000 apartments as part of a £3.5
billion regeneration scheme to create
a new community in the Docklands
area of London. Our fabric-first
philosophy, to minimise energy use
before offsetting via renewables,
allowed an overall reduction in carbon
emissions of between 40 and 50
per cent compared with building
regulations’ minimum standards. In
addition, 900 affordable housing
units at Royal Wharf were constructed
using off-site construction and
prefabrication methods, which has
substantial environmental, societal,
economic, time, quality and health
and safety benefits. This approach has
been shown by research conducted
at Cambridge University to reduce
energy use in construction by 80 per
cent, building operation by 25 per cent
and to contribute to a reduction of 60
per cent in vehicle movements when
compared with traditional techniques,
which often result in a greater number
of small deliveries.
Harnessing technology and
skills
One of the main challenges within the
industry is the need to embrace the
benefits of technology. Smart buildings
can present real opportunities to
optimise the planning and usage of
a building, and help to make the
building run more intelligently and
efficiently, to improve living, working
and leisure environments andto create
a unique building experience tailored
to individual needs. But technology
developments within our sector are still
largely a new and unfamiliar inclusion
for the majority of contractors, so
thereis a need to educate contractors
and clients of the benefits, as well
as to address the disadvantages and
realistic limitations of smart technology
systems to ensure we achieve a safe
and secure cyber environment.
Another problem within engineering
is staff shortage, and disappointingly
it’s still a much more male-orientated
sector, with just 12 per cent of
engineers being women, something
the industry needs to actively help
change. More needs to be done
to educate young people on the
marketability and benefits of a career
in engineering, but for real change
to happen, this problem needs to
be tackled within early education to
push science, technology, engineering
and mathematics industries. At Tate
Consulting our business culture
emphasises ongoing professional
development by creating a workplace
that allows positivity and productivity
to flourish. As a company, if we can
help change the industry work culture
today, we’re hopefully attracting and
retaining talent and inspiring millennials
to solve tomorrow’sproblem s.
Smart buildings
can present
opportunities to
optimise the
planning and
usage of a
building and
help to make
the building run
more intelligently
and efficiently,
to improve
environments
and to create a
unique building
experience
tailored to
individual
needs
Creating a new district
with residential and
retail space in London’s
Docklands

www.tateconsulting.eu

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from The Rt Hon Michael Gove MP.

The Rt Hon Michael Gove MP's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By The Rt Hon Michael Gove MP

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
The Rt Hon Michael Gove MP
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster