The Garage

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by The Garage's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from The Garage is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.thegarage.org.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
54 | THE GARAGE
Executive Director Adam Taylor
The Garage, Norwich
The Garage trust was established to work with those
from challenging circumstances in order to raise their
aspiration and improve their prospects, with inclusion
work permeating every facet of its work. In doing so, The
Garage work with 6,000 participants per year, reach an
audience of 25,000 and support 285 bursaries. They run over
100 regular weekly classes in dance, music and drama and
provide qualifications at GCSE, HNC and, in 2020, MA levels.
Alongside this, they also present and put on productions
for young audiences. Executive Director Adam Taylor tells
TheParliamentary Review
more.
Our previous business model was to sell the majority of our studio space in our
building to external customers and to run project activity around our charitable
objectives. In 2015, however, our major building users were leaving us for their
own sites, and we were forecasting a reduction in income and, alongside this, had
seen a reduction in subsidy from the local authority. We used to think about what
to do with the building, but we now needed to think about what we could do for
thecommunity.
Building a relationship with the right funder
Not so long ago, like many small charities, we would chase small pots of restricted
funding to sustain our portfolio of activity, but this could and would shift our art
forms and the areas that we worked in. However, with the reduction of core subsidy
FACTS ABOUT
THE GARAGE
»Executive Director: Adam Taylor
»Founded in 2002
»Located in Norwich
»Services: Performing arts
centre
»No. of employees: 23
»The building they operate in
was once a car garage, hence
their company name
The Garage
55THE GARAGE |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
– which historically for us came from
the local authority – we had to shift
how we operate and, indeed, how we
raise funds to support our activity and
the communities we workwith.
This meant that we were driven to find
funders to support the activity that we
are presently running, underwriting
the cost of support workers on our
class programme or bursaries to cover
the cost of travel, places on courses
or equipment needed. This utilisation
of subsidy to develop a portfolio of
activity – which had the potential to
become sustainable – brought about a
growth in turnover of 25 per cent over
the last three years.
In this time, we have been operating
without a fundraiser, and the staff in
the organisation have been raising
funds to support their portfolio of
work. We have also found a core
funder who has supported the
business model changes we’ve been
going through. This funder is able
to see the journey to sustainability
for the charitable trust, helping us
focus not on the short-term funding
situation but instead on making
longer-term changes for the trust and
ourcommunity.
The meaning of education for
cultural organisations
Our newest area of growth in recent
times has been in our education
portfolio, an area of work which
sees qualifications delivered to young
people and adults who want to study
outside conventional settings. For a
number of cultural organisations, when
referring to their education provision,
they are referring to the work that they
undertake with education providers or
young people – as did we until recently.
In the 2015-16 period, young people
told us that they wanted us to consider
running qualifications. They wanted
to focus their time at school on what
they considered academic, more
STEM-oriented subjects, but they still
wanted to take creative qualifications.
They wanted to do this, however,
in a setting they found conducive
to the subject matter. Therefore, a HNC Performing Arts
Foundation Programme
students
A dance GCSE
is delivered by
our dance
artists rather
than, for
example, by a
PE teacher
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
54 | THE GARAGE
Executive Director Adam Taylor
The Garage, Norwich
The Garage trust was established to work with those
from challenging circumstances in order to raise their
aspiration and improve their prospects, with inclusion
work permeating every facet of its work. In doing so, The
Garage work with 6,000 participants per year, reach an
audience of 25,000 and support 285 bursaries. They run over
100 regular weekly classes in dance, music and drama and
provide qualifications at GCSE, HNC and, in 2020, MA levels.
Alongside this, they also present and put on productions
for young audiences. Executive Director Adam Taylor tells
TheParliamentary Review
more.
Our previous business model was to sell the majority of our studio space in our
building to external customers and to run project activity around our charitable
objectives. In 2015, however, our major building users were leaving us for their
own sites, and we were forecasting a reduction in income and, alongside this, had
seen a reduction in subsidy from the local authority. We used to think about what
to do with the building, but we now needed to think about what we could do for
thecommunity.
Building a relationship with the right funder
Not so long ago, like many small charities, we would chase small pots of restricted
funding to sustain our portfolio of activity, but this could and would shift our art
forms and the areas that we worked in. However, with the reduction of core subsidy
FACTS ABOUT
THE GARAGE
»Executive Director: Adam Taylor
»Founded in 2002
»Located in Norwich
»Services: Performing arts
centre
»No. of employees: 23
»The building they operate in
was once a car garage, hence
their company name
The Garage
55THE GARAGE |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
– which historically for us came from
the local authority – we had to shift
how we operate and, indeed, how we
raise funds to support our activity and
the communities we workwith.
This meant that we were driven to find
funders to support the activity that we
are presently running, underwriting
the cost of support workers on our
class programme or bursaries to cover
the cost of travel, places on courses
or equipment needed. This utilisation
of subsidy to develop a portfolio of
activity – which had the potential to
become sustainable – brought about a
growth in turnover of 25 per cent over
the last three years.
In this time, we have been operating
without a fundraiser, and the staff in
the organisation have been raising
funds to support their portfolio of
work. We have also found a core
funder who has supported the
business model changes we’ve been
going through. This funder is able
to see the journey to sustainability
for the charitable trust, helping us
focus not on the short-term funding
situation but instead on making
longer-term changes for the trust and
ourcommunity.
The meaning of education for
cultural organisations
Our newest area of growth in recent
times has been in our education
portfolio, an area of work which
sees qualifications delivered to young
people and adults who want to study
outside conventional settings. For a
number of cultural organisations, when
referring to their education provision,
they are referring to the work that they
undertake with education providers or
young people – as did we until recently.
In the 2015-16 period, young people
told us that they wanted us to consider
running qualifications. They wanted
to focus their time at school on what
they considered academic, more
STEM-oriented subjects, but they still
wanted to take creative qualifications.
They wanted to do this, however,
in a setting they found conducive
to the subject matter. Therefore, a HNC Performing Arts
Foundation Programme
students
A dance GCSE
is delivered by
our dance
artists rather
than, for
example, by a
PE teacher
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
56 | THE GARAGE
Review of
Parliament
How long will the prime
minister’s tenure last?
A matter of time
As regular readers will know, the final
pages of
The Parliamentary Review
look back on the most significant
parliamentary incidents of the past
year. Consider our frustration,
therefore, at the fact that our early
September publication date coincides
with what is likely to be one of
the most momentous weeks in
parliament’shistory.
By the time you read this, you will
either be in the midst of the mayhem
or you’ll be reflecting on it from a
safe distance. At the time of writing,
Boris Johnson has been prime minister
just shy of a month. But it’s not until
September that his premiership truly
begins. And, if certain pundits are to be
believed, this may also be the month
when it ends.
A confidence motion is expected to be
tabled by the leader of the opposition
shortly after parliament returns on
September 3, with a small handful of
Conservative MPs said to be seriously
considering voting against their own
government; such is their desperation
to thwart Mr Johnson’s promise to
take Britain out of the EU “come
whatmay”.
If the government to lose the vote, we
will all be dusting off our copies of the
Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011.
The Act, which was passed by the
Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition
government, aimed to transfer the
power to control the electoral timetable
from the prime minister to parliament
by requiring the former to have the
agreement of two-thirds of the house
in order to call an election.
Crucially, the Act also allows the prime
minister a stay of execution in the event
of a lost confidence vote. Rather than
having to call an election immediately
upon defeat, as was the case prior to
2011, there is now a 14-day period
during which he or an alternate leader
has a chance to secure a majority of
support in the Commons.
Normally, this would be incidental. At
present, with the clock ticking towards
October 31, the date on which it is
legally mandated for Britain to leave
the European Union, 14 days could
make all the difference.
Once the two weeks are up, if no new
government has been formed, an
election must be called and the power
for choosing the date rests entirely with
the prime minister.
Rather than limiting Mr Johnson, this
Act, at this particular moment in time,
has provided him with an unexpected
source of strength. Even if he is
defeated in a confidence motion on
September 3, an election will not be
dance GCSE is delivered by our dance
artists rather than, for example, by a
PE teacher, and drama is taught by a
director in a theatre that produces its
own professional performance work.
Accordingly, we began delivering
GCSEs by setting up as an exam
centre, which soon saw us develop
into delivering HNCs too – essentially,
this is an intensive qualification to
support progression of young people
from colleges to universities, as well
as to dance and drama schools. This
programme is in its second year and
is seeing real success, with many
students receiving offers to higher
education institutions.
Our theatre is core to our
work
Our small studio space, which can seat
up to 180 people, started by mostly
hosting youth theatre. We started
programming professional work and
curating the performance offer in
2011, and in 2016 we began making
our own performance work. This has
been a real catalyst for growing our
reputation and reach.
We make interactive performance
work for toddlers and their families so
that they can have their first cultural
experiences together – this has grown
from 12 shows in year one to 156
across four productions three years
later. During Christmas, we saw a
little under 4,000 audience members,
even when the seating capacity was
limited to just 70. As we continue
to make and programme work for
young audiences, we consider how
we can better support artists that
are producing this great work. Ways
in which we do this range from our
work-in-progress nights, through to
giving space to develop ideas, as well
as hosting workshops with young
people to ensure work is made with,
and not just for, young people.
Looking forwards
To date, we have been creating a
business model that enables us to
grow our own income, which also
supports our charity work. When this
income exceeds covering the direct
overheads, this will mean we can rely
less on funding from other sources
to underwrite our charitable and
inclusionwork.
We are always looking to broaden
our horizons by seeking out other
geographic areas that could benefit
from our ethos. We constantly review
how our approach can be utilised to
reach other communities that need
it – be this in the form of adding more
sites, in the form of a partnership
or even just as a consultant. The
challenge for us is carrying this out
with our finite capacity.
We’ve had to show courage while
building and expanding our business
model to support the trust and our
beneficiaries in the long term –
especially given that benefits are not
always immediate. Managing the
short-term funding – at times near
crisis point – has not been easy, but
we know that thinking of the bigger,
longer-term picture is what’s essential
to our continued success.
We make
interactive
performance
work for
toddlers and
their families
so that they
can have their
first cultural
experiences
together
Little Red Riding Hood
57REVIEW OF PARLIAMENT |
Review of
Parliament
How long will the prime
minister’s tenure last?
A matter of time
As regular readers will know, the final
pages of
The Parliamentary Review
look back on the most significant
parliamentary incidents of the past
year. Consider our frustration,
therefore, at the fact that our early
September publication date coincides
with what is likely to be one of
the most momentous weeks in
parliament’shistory.
By the time you read this, you will
either be in the midst of the mayhem
or you’ll be reflecting on it from a
safe distance. At the time of writing,
Boris Johnson has been prime minister
just shy of a month. But it’s not until
September that his premiership truly
begins. And, if certain pundits are to be
believed, this may also be the month
when it ends.
A confidence motion is expected to be
tabled by the leader of the opposition
shortly after parliament returns on
September 3, with a small handful of
Conservative MPs said to be seriously
considering voting against their own
government; such is their desperation
to thwart Mr Johnson’s promise to
take Britain out of the EU “come
whatmay”.
If the government to lose the vote, we
will all be dusting off our copies of the
Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011.
The Act, which was passed by the
Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition
government, aimed to transfer the
power to control the electoral timetable
from the prime minister to parliament
by requiring the former to have the
agreement of two-thirds of the house
in order to call an election.
Crucially, the Act also allows the prime
minister a stay of execution in the event
of a lost confidence vote. Rather than
having to call an election immediately
upon defeat, as was the case prior to
2011, there is now a 14-day period
during which he or an alternate leader
has a chance to secure a majority of
support in the Commons.
Normally, this would be incidental. At
present, with the clock ticking towards
October 31, the date on which it is
legally mandated for Britain to leave
the European Union, 14 days could
make all the difference.
Once the two weeks are up, if no new
government has been formed, an
election must be called and the power
for choosing the date rests entirely with
the prime minister.
Rather than limiting Mr Johnson, this
Act, at this particular moment in time,
has provided him with an unexpected
source of strength. Even if he is
defeated in a confidence motion on
September 3, an election will not be

www.thegarage.org.uk

This article was sponsored by The Garage. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster