Tweed Media

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Tweed Media's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Tweed Media is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.tweed-media.com

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
56 | TWEED MEDIA
A Tweed Media press call and
product launch for client John
Rigby & Co for the launch of their
Rising Bite Double Rifle at Safari
Club International Convention
Co-founders Simon
and Selena Barr
Simon Barr has always been passionate about the great
outdoors. As an experienced writer and photographer with
years of experience in business and brand development,
marketing and events, he established Scottish Borders-based
Tweed Media with his wife, Selena, in 2009. Their mission was
to get their clients – who work in the outdoor leisure sector –
the recognition they deserve, both in the media and the minds
of consumers. Simon tells
The Parliamentary Review
more about
their work.
We are a specialist PR and marketing consultancy with a specific focus on field
sports, including game shooting and deer stalking. Our clients include shotgun and
rifle makers, optics manufacturers and clothing and footwear companies. Though
proud of our British roots, we have grown to have an international outlook.
Base camp and beyond
Our headquarters are in Coldstream in the Scottish Borders. Travel is a big part of
our business. Client meetings and content generation activities – such as hunting in
remote locations – mean that we frequently find ourselves working far from base,
whether it’s in a convention centre in Las Vegas, on a sun-baked African plain or
with a Sami dog-sled in Greenland.
Clients come to us for our unrivalled combination of contacts across all media
channels in the sector, high-quality work and our own experience in the field. One
of our co-founders, Selena Barr, has been a keen game shot and deerstalker for
more than a decade. She is also an award-winning journalist.
FACTS ABOUT
TWEED MEDIA
»Co-founders: Simon and
Selena Barr
»Founded in 2009
»Based in Coldstream, Scottish
Borders
»Services: Public relations,
content generation, press
events, photography, video
and social media
»No. of employees: 10
»We have a 90 per cent female
team, forging a path in one
of the most male-dominated
outdoor industries
»Simon and Selena acquired a
second business – Fieldsports
Press Ltd – in July 2018. They
took over 2 journal titles
and have launched a third
publication since
Tweed Media
57TWEED MEDIA |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Day-to-day
From punchy press releases,
promotional videos and corporate
partnerships to eye-catching events
and thought-provoking magazine
features, we work closely with each
one of our clients to assess the
best ways to secure positive and
memorable coverage. We aim to
stimulate consumer demand and
foster brand loyalty, as well as increase
brandawareness.
Our work can vary dramatically: one
day we’ll be organising BBC Radio 4’s
Today
programme outside broadcast
from The Game Fair; another we’ll
be helping with the launch of a new
rifle in the Scottish Highlands – after
that, we’ll be working with top game
chefs to illustrate the environmental,
nutritional and culinary advantages of
harvesting and eating game meat. We
know that the small things matter as
much as the big things and treat each
task with the same kind of care and
attention todetail.
Fairness, flexibility and faith
For our clients, we endeavour to
understand their business and needs
so well that they can have faith in
us to market their products with the
same level of dedication that they
would themselves. We like clients to
feel that we are an extension of their
business, rather than seeing us as
externalconsultants.
For our staff, we have a flexible, fair
and considerate culture. Employing the
best people to achieve the best results
has always been of critical importance
to us; passion for and understanding of
our sector are just as vital as editorial,
organisational and interpersonal skills.
We are flexible when it comes to
working hours and locations so long as
the quality of work is not affected; we
don’t have a nine-to-five office culture.
As a result, a number of team members
are able to work atypical hours around
family and other commitments.
Interestingly, this approach to staffing
Tweed Media generating
authentic and original
media content on the
Old Silk Route in the
Tien Shan mountains,
Kyrgyzstan
We aim to
stimulate
consumer
demand and
foster brand
loyalty, as well
as increase
brand
awareness
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
56 | TWEED MEDIA
A Tweed Media press call and
product launch for client John
Rigby & Co for the launch of their
Rising Bite Double Rifle at Safari
Club International Convention
Co-founders Simon
and Selena Barr
Simon Barr has always been passionate about the great
outdoors. As an experienced writer and photographer with
years of experience in business and brand development,
marketing and events, he established Scottish Borders-based
Tweed Media with his wife, Selena, in 2009. Their mission was
to get their clients – who work in the outdoor leisure sector –
the recognition they deserve, both in the media and the minds
of consumers. Simon tells
The Parliamentary Review
more about
their work.
We are a specialist PR and marketing consultancy with a specific focus on field
sports, including game shooting and deer stalking. Our clients include shotgun and
rifle makers, optics manufacturers and clothing and footwear companies. Though
proud of our British roots, we have grown to have an international outlook.
Base camp and beyond
Our headquarters are in Coldstream in the Scottish Borders. Travel is a big part of
our business. Client meetings and content generation activities – such as hunting in
remote locations – mean that we frequently find ourselves working far from base,
whether it’s in a convention centre in Las Vegas, on a sun-baked African plain or
with a Sami dog-sled in Greenland.
Clients come to us for our unrivalled combination of contacts across all media
channels in the sector, high-quality work and our own experience in the field. One
of our co-founders, Selena Barr, has been a keen game shot and deerstalker for
more than a decade. She is also an award-winning journalist.
FACTS ABOUT
TWEED MEDIA
»Co-founders: Simon and
Selena Barr
»Founded in 2009
»Based in Coldstream, Scottish
Borders
»Services: Public relations,
content generation, press
events, photography, video
and social media
»No. of employees: 10
»We have a 90 per cent female
team, forging a path in one
of the most male-dominated
outdoor industries
»Simon and Selena acquired a
second business – Fieldsports
Press Ltd – in July 2018. They
took over 2 journal titles
and have launched a third
publication since
Tweed Media
57TWEED MEDIA |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Day-to-day
From punchy press releases,
promotional videos and corporate
partnerships to eye-catching events
and thought-provoking magazine
features, we work closely with each
one of our clients to assess the
best ways to secure positive and
memorable coverage. We aim to
stimulate consumer demand and
foster brand loyalty, as well as increase
brandawareness.
Our work can vary dramatically: one
day we’ll be organising BBC Radio 4’s
Today
programme outside broadcast
from The Game Fair; another we’ll
be helping with the launch of a new
rifle in the Scottish Highlands – after
that, we’ll be working with top game
chefs to illustrate the environmental,
nutritional and culinary advantages of
harvesting and eating game meat. We
know that the small things matter as
much as the big things and treat each
task with the same kind of care and
attention todetail.
Fairness, flexibility and faith
For our clients, we endeavour to
understand their business and needs
so well that they can have faith in
us to market their products with the
same level of dedication that they
would themselves. We like clients to
feel that we are an extension of their
business, rather than seeing us as
externalconsultants.
For our staff, we have a flexible, fair
and considerate culture. Employing the
best people to achieve the best results
has always been of critical importance
to us; passion for and understanding of
our sector are just as vital as editorial,
organisational and interpersonal skills.
We are flexible when it comes to
working hours and locations so long as
the quality of work is not affected; we
don’t have a nine-to-five office culture.
As a result, a number of team members
are able to work atypical hours around
family and other commitments.
Interestingly, this approach to staffing
Tweed Media generating
authentic and original
media content on the
Old Silk Route in the
Tien Shan mountains,
Kyrgyzstan
We aim to
stimulate
consumer
demand and
foster brand
loyalty, as well
as increase
brand
awareness
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
58 | TWEED MEDIA
Review of
Parliament
How long will the prime
minister’s tenure last?
A matter of time
As regular readers will know, the final
pages of
The Parliamentary Review
look back on the most significant
parliamentary incidents of the past year.
Consider our frustration, therefore,
at the fact that our early September
publication date coincides with what is
likely to be one of the most momentous
weeks in parliament’s history.
By the time you read this, you will either
be in the midst of the mayhem or you’ll
be reflecting on it from a safe distance.
At the time of writing, Boris Johnson
has been prime minister just shy of a
month. But it’s not until September
that his premiership truly begins. And,
if certain pundits are to be believed, this
may also be the month when it ends.
A confidence motion is expected to be
tabled by the leader of the opposition
shortly after parliament returns on
September 3, with a small handful of
Conservative MPs said to be seriously
considering voting against their own
government; such is their desperation
to thwart MrJohnson’s promise to take
Britain out of the EU “come what may”.
If the government to lose the vote, we
will all be dusting off our copies of the
Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011.
The Act, which was passed by the
Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition
government, aimed to transfer the
power to control the electoral timetable
from the prime minister to parliament
by requiring the former to have the
agreement of two-thirds of the house
in order to call an election.
Crucially, the Act also allows the prime
minister a stay of execution in the event
of a lost confidence vote. Rather than
having to call an election immediately
upon defeat, as was the case prior to
2011, there is now a 14-day period
during which he or an alternate leader
has a chance to secure a majority of
support in the Commons.
Normally, this would be incidental. At
present, with the clock ticking towards
October 31, the date on which it is
legally mandated for Britain to leave
the European Union, 14 days could
make all the difference.
Once the two weeks are up, if no new
government has been formed, an
election must be called and the power
for choosing the date rests entirely with
the prime minister.
Rather than limiting MrJohnson, this
Act, at this particular moment in time,
has provided him with an unexpected
source of strength. Even if he is
defeated in a confidence motion on
September 3, an election will not be
announced until October 17. At this
point, MrJohnson can announce that
the election will take place on October
31, or a date shortly thereafter, with
parliament closed in the interim,
has resulted in our workforce being
95 per cent female – noteworthy,
given the extent to which the rest of
fieldsports remains male-dominated.
Additionally, we are conscious that we
and our clients are ambassadors for
fieldsports to the general public. Game
and target shooting and deer stalking
have many social, environmental and
economic benefits, but these are not
always obvious to the casual observer.
As well as showing our clients’ products
to best effect to their target market, we
also take every opportunity to publicise
the benefits of environmental and social
initiatives in which they are involved,
such as our client John Rigby & Co.’s
donation of a rapid-response vehicle to
the tiger conservation team in India’s
Jim Corbett National Park in 2016.
Closer to home, we have provided
services free of charge to The British
Deer Society, a charity which promotes
research, education and training to
help secure a sustainable and balanced
deer population in the UK.
Barriers, banks and Brexit
Like all small and new businesses, we
have had to overcome a number of
hurdles. Banks’ extreme reluctance to
lend in the wake of the 2008 financial
crisis, coupled with an increasingly
aggressive tax regime and the lack of
available relief for new businesses, put
significant strain on our early years and
slowed our expansion.
Two days of business consultancy
provided by the Scottish government
were helpful, but in general we felt that
a lack of grants, reliefs and guidance was
a significant barrier to entrepreneurship.
More recently, uncertainty and lack of
guidance over Brexit has made trading
with overseas clients more difficult.
Other difficulties are more sector-
specific. Online restrictions on content
involving firearms often make it
hard for legitimate sporting firearms
businesses to establish a web-based
presence and to use social media
channels to engage with the public.
Inconsistencies and grey areas in UK
firearms legislation have also been
problematic, causing inconvenient
delays while the Home Office has
to assess and clarify specific points
relevant to our business. We are
completely in favour of all legislation
and recognise it as right and proper
– but, when operating as a business,
there are complications and difficulties
thanks to the ambiguity it creates.
Expanding horizons
Over the past three years, our client
base outside of the UK has increased
significantly. Half of our income is now
derived from the US, but we remain
a truly international business. With its
strong outdoors culture, specifically in
the hunting sector, the US has always
been a logical target market for us.
We are in the process of opening an
office in Houston, Texas, to be our
US headquarters. Further overseas
expansion is also on the agenda, and
we are hoping for foreign investment
to support this. As well as expanding
geographically, we aim to increase the
amount we work in areas that are less
heavily regulated than firearms.
Game and
target
shooting and
deer stalking
have many
social,
environmental
and economic
benefits, but
these are not
always obvious
to the casual
observer
Tweed Media are
specialists at generating
awareness on and offline
for their clients within a
very niche market
59REVIEW OF PARLIAMENT |
Review of
Parliament
How long will the prime
minister’s tenure last?
A matter of time
As regular readers will know, the final
pages of
The Parliamentary Review
look back on the most significant
parliamentary incidents of the past year.
Consider our frustration, therefore,
at the fact that our early September
publication date coincides with what is
likely to be one of the most momentous
weeks in parliament’s history.
By the time you read this, you will either
be in the midst of the mayhem or you’ll
be reflecting on it from a safe distance.
At the time of writing, Boris Johnson
has been prime minister just shy of a
month. But it’s not until September
that his premiership truly begins. And,
if certain pundits are to be believed, this
may also be the month when it ends.
A confidence motion is expected to be
tabled by the leader of the opposition
shortly after parliament returns on
September 3, with a small handful of
Conservative MPs said to be seriously
considering voting against their own
government; such is their desperation
to thwart MrJohnson’s promise to take
Britain out of the EU “come what may”.
If the government to lose the vote, we
will all be dusting off our copies of the
Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011.
The Act, which was passed by the
Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition
government, aimed to transfer the
power to control the electoral timetable
from the prime minister to parliament
by requiring the former to have the
agreement of two-thirds of the house
in order to call an election.
Crucially, the Act also allows the prime
minister a stay of execution in the event
of a lost confidence vote. Rather than
having to call an election immediately
upon defeat, as was the case prior to
2011, there is now a 14-day period
during which he or an alternate leader
has a chance to secure a majority of
support in the Commons.
Normally, this would be incidental. At
present, with the clock ticking towards
October 31, the date on which it is
legally mandated for Britain to leave
the European Union, 14 days could
make all the difference.
Once the two weeks are up, if no new
government has been formed, an
election must be called and the power
for choosing the date rests entirely with
the prime minister.
Rather than limiting MrJohnson, this
Act, at this particular moment in time,
has provided him with an unexpected
source of strength. Even if he is
defeated in a confidence motion on
September 3, an election will not be
announced until October 17. At this
point, MrJohnson can announce that
the election will take place on October
31, or a date shortly thereafter, with
parliament closed in the interim,

www.tweed-media.com

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster