Venus Healthcare Homes

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Venus Healthcare Homes's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Venus Healthcare Homes is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

venushealthcare.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | VENUS HEALTHCARE HOMES
CEO Khin Nadarajah
Rehabilitative care in the community
lies at the heart of everything we do
Venus Healthcare’s CEO, Khin Nadarajah, tells
TheParliamentary Review
that its progressive attitude
to residential care has led its person-centred approach
and enabled it to meet individual needs time and time again.
Khin says that Venus strives to discover the best in people, and
makes a real difference to the lives of its service users, focusing
on creating a better future for them.
By industry norms in the private care sector, Venus Healthcare is a minnow – an
independently owned and operated care group of 15 years’ standing with specialist
residential units in London.
Ask any dedicated specialist angler what is the biggest prize of a weekend’s
fishing and the answer will be a pike – magnificent creatures that can grow up
to 22 inches in length and over 60 pounds in weight, and which, camouflaged,
will lurk for as long as necessary to be near their sources of food. All of
which perfectly sums up what Venus Healthcare is now becoming. A minnow
turnedhunter.
In explaining the reasons for this transition, a critical light needs to be shone onto
the CQC in its role as the sector’s regulator. We believe it is in danger of stifling
the private healthcare sector from widening its provision of specialist services
for people with complex needs requiring long or lifelong care and support,
including those with moderate to profound learning disabilities, autism and other
neurologicalconditions.
FACTS ABOUT
VENUS HEALTHCARE HOMES
»CEO: Khin Nadarajah
»Founded in 2004
»Located in Hampton
»Services: Specialist residential
care
»No. of employees: 100
Venus Healthcare
Homes
19VENUS HEALTHCARE HOMES |
CARE
Size matters
In 2016 the CQC set out its framework
for the design of accommodation and
personal care that could be registered
in a document called
Registering the
Right Support
. The document initially
stated that schemes should be for no
more than six occupants. Following
a consultation period, subsequent
guidance was issued in June 2017 that
acknowledged “the need to have a
measure of flexibility in regard to the
size of services”. In practice the CQC
has rigidly adhered to the concept of
limiting accommodation for people to
very small numbers, on the basis that
services of more than six people could
easily become institutionalised.
In following this approach, the CQC
has created a rod for its own back.
On the one hand, it has failed to
recognise that for investors such
as our company, with a genuine
commitment and, as importantly, the
means to provide more services, it is
barely economically viable to purchase
and operate smaller residential units.
As a result of this, the regulated sector
is failing to expand sufficiently to meet
current needs.
The growth of the
unregulated care market
The CQC’s restriction on size has
inadvertently led to the mushrooming
of a secondary care market typically
comprised of larger residential homes
over which the CQC has no jurisdiction
or control. And the situation
isconcerning.
In these quasi-care homes, which
operate under the radar and without
CQC’s scrutiny, service users are
more likely to receive a poor quality
of care and, worse still, be vulnerable
toabuse.
More specifically, as many of these
homes are based away from the
large conurbations, and therefore
offer cheaper placements than the
“regulated” and smaller inner city
homes, this has given local authorities
– often in London – a reason to farm
out service users to these quasi-care
homes often in the North and the
Midlands – frequently far removed
from the service users’ home and
families, and which have little or no
duty of care.
These out-of-area placements are not
only discriminatory and damaging
to the well-being and prospects of
recovery for service-users, the lack
of proper scrutiny increases the
risk of abuse, as the experience of
Winterbourne so vividly illustrated. “Know what, this is
better than Strictly… “
“And it had been there
the whole time… just
where I’d put it earlier”
A critical light
needs to be
shone on the
CQC as the
sector’s
regulator
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
19VENUS HEALTHCARE HOMES |
CARE
Size matters
In 2016 the CQC set out its framework
for the design of accommodation and
personal care that could be registered
in a document called
Registering the
Right Support
. The document initially
stated that schemes should be for no
more than six occupants. Following
a consultation period, subsequent
guidance was issued in June 2017 that
acknowledged “the need to have a
measure of flexibility in regard to the
size of services”. In practice the CQC
has rigidly adhered to the concept of
limiting accommodation for people to
very small numbers, on the basis that
services of more than six people could
easily become institutionalised.
In following this approach, the CQC
has created a rod for its own back.
On the one hand, it has failed to
recognise that for investors such
as our company, with a genuine
commitment and, as importantly, the
means to provide more services, it is
barely economically viable to purchase
and operate smaller residential units.
As a result of this, the regulated sector
is failing to expand sufficiently to meet
current needs.
The growth of the
unregulated care market
The CQC’s restriction on size has
inadvertently led to the mushrooming
of a secondary care market typically
comprised of larger residential homes
over which the CQC has no jurisdiction
or control. And the situation
isconcerning.
In these quasi-care homes, which
operate under the radar and without
CQC’s scrutiny, service users are
more likely to receive a poor quality
of care and, worse still, be vulnerable
toabuse.
More specifically, as many of these
homes are based away from the
large conurbations, and therefore
offer cheaper placements than the
“regulated” and smaller inner city
homes, this has given local authorities
– often in London – a reason to farm
out service users to these quasi-care
homes often in the North and the
Midlands – frequently far removed
from the service users’ home and
families, and which have little or no
duty of care.
These out-of-area placements are not
only discriminatory and damaging
to the well-being and prospects of
recovery for service-users, the lack
of proper scrutiny increases the
risk of abuse, as the experience of
Winterbourne so vividly illustrated. “Know what, this is
better than Strictly… “
“And it had been there
the whole time… just
where I’d put it earlier”
A critical light
needs to be
shone on the
CQC as the
sector’s
regulator
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
20 | VENUS HEALTHCARE HOMES
The situation is concerning
This secondary market in care is now
thriving and will continue to grow
unless the root causes of the problem
are addressed. The CQC continues to
exercise its responsibilities diligently,
and for the most part extremely
well on behalf of service users. The
situation is concerning, and legislators
should take note.
The consequence of this, for groups
like Venus Healthcare, which want to
expand but are otherwise constrained by
financial logic from doing so, necessity
has become the mother of invention,
much like the hungry pike that lurks
quietly in still waters, Venus has been
waiting for the right time tostrike.
Care village
Our opportunity for doing so came
in 2017. Frustrated by the restrictions
being imposed by the CQC, but
simultaneously being spurred on by
the government’s promise to publish
plans on social care reforms, since
accorded the highest priority by Boris
Johnson, Venus began planning for a
new concept in care focused on rapidly
expanding provision for the elderly.
This concept was aimed at the
very high incidence of people
with dementia – estimated by the
Alzheimer’s Society to rise to over one
million by 2021 at an “in-patient” cost
to the NHS of over £480 million.
As a result of two years of exhaustive
planning and research, and very precise
economic modelling, including the
development and costing of detailed
architectural designs, Venus Healthcare
is now poised to open its first care
village in the UK. We hope to not only
unlock bed-blocking in the NHS but will
also, in doing so, provide social care
commissioners with placement costs
that are affordable. This will mean that
for the first time, people of lesser wealth
will be able to receive the same quality
of care, at present only accessible to
those with the means topay.
A four-letter word
Today, plans for the opening of Venus’s
first care village are at an advanced
stage. However, another major obstacle
has been identified that requires
legislative action if dementia is to be
accorded the provision of care that is
required. This obstacle can be summed
up in a single four-letter word: L A N D.
There is an urgent requirement to
relax planning restrictions, particularly
for local authorities, so that land in
or near to the large conurbations,
where the highest numbers of elderly
are concentrated, can be released for
new builds. In tandem with this, new
legislation should also prohibit cash-
strapped hospitals and NHS trusts from
selling land to commercial developers
before it is offered instead to bona fide
developers committed to increasing
the capacity of care in thecommunity.
The independent healthcare sector
has a major role to play in shaping,
and providing, services for people
falling within the scope of the
transforming care agenda. This can
only be achieved with government
support and interventions where
necessary, ensuring that business
creativity and technological innovation
is notstrangled.
The
independent
healthcare
sector has a
major role to
play in
shaping and
delivering the
social care
agenda. This
can only be
achieved with
government
intervention
andsupport
Our care village in the
UK is modelled on a
similar development we
are leading in Malaysia

venushealthcare.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Venus Healthcare Homes. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development