Wessex Local Medical Committees

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Wessex Local Medical Committees's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Wessex Local Medical Committees is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.wessexlmcs.com

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
26 | THE CHRISTIE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST
We are also constructing a new cancer
research centre to replace the fire-
damaged Paterson building. Developed
in partnership with the University of
Manchester and Cancer Research UK,
this centre will deliver our ambition
of becoming one of the world’s top
five centres for basic, translational and
clinical cancer research by 2025. The
centre will facilitate an unprecedented
amount of interaction between patients,
clinicians and researchers to deliver
groundbreaking research. It will be a
beacon for attracting some of the most
promising international clinicians and
researchers to work with us through
our internationally recognised clinical
and research fellowships programme.
We have also recently opened our
dedicated proton therapy research
room, located in the same centre as
our clinical service, and conducting the
first clinical trials in the UK using proton
beam therapy. A trial for head and
neck cancer will look at the long-term
benefits and quality-of-life indications
for patients, and further proton beam
therapy trials will be funded through
a recent £4.5 million philanthropic
donation from businessman Ian Taylor.
To support these efforts, we have
developed The Christie Proton
School as an international centre of
excellence in proton beam therapy,
with expertise that can be exported
worldwide. This builds on the success
of our international consultancy arm
– The Christie International – currently
working on projects in places such as
Fuzhou in China and Cork in Ireland.
In order to further drive improved
patient outcomes, we are harnessing
the power of big data and machine
learning. This helps us to use real-
time clinical insights to support clinical
decision-making. We have also entered
into a Cancer Precision Medicine
Partnership with Roche for the rapid
development of the next generation of
targeted cancer therapies.
This work is catapulting the UK
to become a leader in real-world,
data-driven research, discovering
and developing the next generation
of cancer medicines, realising the
benefits of personalised healthcare and
contributing to the UK life sciences
industrial strategy ambitions.
Always pioneering
The Christie has been an innovator for
more than 100 years, from the first use
of radiation therapy to the first clinical
trials of Tamoxifen. Patients are at the
heart of everything we do and our
ethos is to constantly find new ways to
deliver better outcomes and care, both
now and in the future. Innovation is in
our DNA. We look forward to making a
substantial contribution to the delivery
of the NHS Long Term Plan for cancer.
None of our work would be possible
without the support we receive from a
wide range of stakeholders – from our
staff, patients, fundraisers and partners,
to our commissioners, councillors, MPs,
ministers and NHS England. With their
ongoing support, we will continue to
drive forward improvements in patient
outcomes and reshape cancer care
over the next decade.
This centre
will deliver our
ambition of
becoming one
of the world’s
top five
centres for
basic,
translational
and clinical
cancer
research by
2025
Architect’s impression
of our new research
building
27WESSEX LOCAL MEDICAL COMMITTEES |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
Chief Executive Dr Nigel Watson
MBE
Wessex LMCs’ annual
conference, November 2019
Wessex Local Medical Committees covers a population
of three and a half million across Bath, northeast
Somerset, Dorset, Hampshire, the Isle of Wight,
Swindon and Wiltshire. The organisation supports over 3,000
GPs working across 450 practices, and serves as the local
representative body for NHS GPs. CEO, Dr Nigel Watson MBE,
tells
The Parliamentary Review
that the organisation exists solely
to represent, advise and support GPs and their practices.
We help and support individual GPs and practices and provide a voice for the
profession at a local level. We get involved in local negotiations and engage in joint
working with hospitals, community providers, local authorities, clinical commissioning
groups, NHS England and Public Health England. Beyond this, we also work with
national bodies such as the British Medical Association and the Royal College of GPs.
We were first established in 1911 when the government introduced the
National Insurance Act. At that time, GPs were called panel doctors and with the
introduction of the NHS in 1946, LMCs became the local representative body for
GPs in every part of the UK.
The NHS under strain
Over the past ten years, the NHS has faced many challenges. This includes not
only significant financial pressure but also issues associated with an ageing
population and an increasing frequency of chronic diseases. The result of this is
a significant increase in workload for general practice. Each day, over one million
people are seen in general practice – alternatively, there are more than 400 million
FACTS ABOUT
WESSEX LOCAL MEDICAL
COMMITTEES
»Chief Executive: Dr Nigel Watson
MBE
»Local medical communities
established in 1911
»Based in Eastleigh, Hampshire
»Services: Support and
representation for GPs
»No. of employees: 18
»No. of members: Over 3,000
Wessex Local Medical
Committees
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
28 | WESSEX LOCAL MEDICAL COMMITTEES
appointments a year. On average, a
person will consult with a GP between
four and five times a year.
This has not been met with a
sufficient increase in workforce. One
of the consequences of this is the
real challenge in terms of recruiting
and retaining GPs, and despite the
government’s commitment to boosting
the number of GPs by 5,000, we have
actually seen a reduction.
With the current demands on hospital-
based care and community services,
many patients have witnessed
fragmented care with access becoming
ever more difficult.
As a local body, we have always felt
that we serve our members best by
developing relationships with key
organisations and ensuring that there
is a culture of support. With this in
mind, we have developed a number of
services to support our members.
Working to support GPs
We recognise that for some practices
the working day has become longer
and the workload has become
unmanageable. If a GP retires or leaves
prematurely, and the practice cannot
recruit, the pressure on the remaining
GPs increases and this can lead to a
mass exodus.
To tackle this, we have recruited
a number of experienced GPs. In
practices where there is difficulty,
we can place them for up to three
months – with the option to extend
to six – which provides the practice
with some much-needed clinical
help. By doing this, we have seen a
number of practices who are facing
extreme difficulty being turned around
and regaining their ability to recruit
andretain.
In any practice, the practice manager
is critically important and all too often
forgotten. We attend a number of
practice manager forums across the
counties we work in and we also
have a number of practice manager
supporters who work for a few hours
per month offering advice and support
to their colleagues.
Being a GP is a demanding job that
involves managing complex issues,
often with over 100 patient contacts a
day. The result of this is a high rate of
burnout and mental health problems
Dr Laura Edwards and
Dr Julia Hempenstall
discussing the content of
the “Triple E GP” project
instigated by Wessex
LMCs’ GP fellows
Each day, over
one million
people are
seen in general
practice
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
28 | WESSEX LOCAL MEDICAL COMMITTEES
appointments a year. On average, a
person will consult with a GP between
four and five times a year.
This has not been met with a
sufficient increase in workforce. One
of the consequences of this is the
real challenge in terms of recruiting
and retaining GPs, and despite the
government’s commitment to boosting
the number of GPs by 5,000, we have
actually seen a reduction.
With the current demands on hospital-
based care and community services,
many patients have witnessed
fragmented care with access becoming
ever more difficult.
As a local body, we have always felt
that we serve our members best by
developing relationships with key
organisations and ensuring that there
is a culture of support. With this in
mind, we have developed a number of
services to support our members.
Working to support GPs
We recognise that for some practices
the working day has become longer
and the workload has become
unmanageable. If a GP retires or leaves
prematurely, and the practice cannot
recruit, the pressure on the remaining
GPs increases and this can lead to a
mass exodus.
To tackle this, we have recruited
a number of experienced GPs. In
practices where there is difficulty,
we can place them for up to three
months – with the option to extend
to six – which provides the practice
with some much-needed clinical
help. By doing this, we have seen a
number of practices who are facing
extreme difficulty being turned around
and regaining their ability to recruit
andretain.
In any practice, the practice manager
is critically important and all too often
forgotten. We attend a number of
practice manager forums across the
counties we work in and we also
have a number of practice manager
supporters who work for a few hours
per month offering advice and support
to their colleagues.
Being a GP is a demanding job that
involves managing complex issues,
often with over 100 patient contacts a
day. The result of this is a high rate of
burnout and mental health problems
Dr Laura Edwards and
Dr Julia Hempenstall
discussing the content of
the “Triple E GP” project
instigated by Wessex
LMCs’ GP fellows
Each day, over
one million
people are
seen in general
practice
29WESSEX LOCAL MEDICAL COMMITTEES |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
among GPs. It is therefore important
to support GPs, and we have
created a supporting development
programme that will offer one-to-
one mentoring engagement, support
advice and, if necessary, signposting to
otherservices.
The importance of training
About seven years ago, we recognised
that the only training available for
practice staff was either poor quality,
not available locally or very expensive.
We therefore set up an education
and training unit which delivers
over 200 courses every year, often
withinpractices.
In the past, there has been a significant
amount of GP education available but
over a period of time, the needs of GPs
have changed and they now access
their education through a number of
different avenues. We are therefore
developing a GP education offer that
will involve podcasts, video pods and
local and regional conferences to
ensure GPs’ needs are met.
Engaging nationally
As a result of the work that we have
done over the last few years, I was
invited by the Secretary of State for
Health and Social Care to be the
independent chair of a review into the
future of the GP partnership model.
This has now been completed and
recommendations have been made
to the government. During this time,
I was also involved in the primary care
part of the long-term plan as well as
the new contract that was offered to
GPs to develop primary care networks.
These are based on populations
between 30,000 and 50,000 and focus
on the needs of that community.
As a result of this national initiative,
we have worked with local, specialist
medical solicitors, accountants and
property experts to support GP
practices and our patients to try and
ensure that they all benefit from
thisinitiative.
The NHS is changing in response
to the challenges it faces and as a
result, the government has committed
to increased funding for the NHS.
Thiswas set out under the long-term
plan, a ten-year plan that detailed
where the investment was to be made
and the benefits this would bring. One
of the core features of the plan is to
develop the out-of-hospital model,
reducing the dependency on hospital-
based care and ensuring that there are
more services provided. Communities
with general practice play an important
part in coordinating and delivering
thiscare.
Despite the challenges that are faced
by GPs, and the profession as a whole,
we believe that the next ten years will
be an exciting time for general practice
and will see great strides forward in
terms of the care that it delivers. In
order to support those who work
within our communities as well as
patients and practices, resources need
to be committed and bodies need to
come together to work collaboratively.
This isn’t a choice: it is essential if we
want to improve services and make
the most efficient use of the resources
wehave.
Despite the
challenges
that are faced
by GPs, the
next ten years
will be an
exciting time
for general
practice
Wessex LMCs covers a
population of three and
a half million

www.wessexlmcs.com

This article was sponsored by Wessex Local Medical Committees. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development