Yesoiday HaTorah School Manchester

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Yesoiday HaTorah School Manchester's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Yesoiday HaTorah School Manchester is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.yhs.org.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
44 | YESOIDAY HATORAH SCHOOL MANCHESTER
Headteacher
Dr Jonathan Yodaiken
Our warm and nurturing
nursery setting
Yesoiday HaTorah Academy School in Prestwich, Greater
Manchester, opened in 1945 as an independent school,
achieving state aid 52 years ago and academy status in
April 2011. From small beginnings, the school is now one of the
largest and most successful schools in Manchester, with over
900 pupils on roll and a five-form entry. Over the last decade,
the school’s results and Ofsted outcomes have been strong, but
this has not come without difficulties. Headteacher Dr Jonathan
Yodaiken has been responsible for turning the school around
and tells the
Review
more about this journey.
Helping others to succeed in education, be it schools or parents, is my passion,
which is why I am a local leader of education, the author of two books on
parenting and a valued consultant, sharing good practice and strategies with
colleagues across the country. I’ve also been a member of the Primary Headteachers
Reference Group for over eight years, which meets regularly in the DfE, reviewing
and discussing, with a group of successful headteachers, education, legislation and
issues pertaining to schools throughout the country.
My philosophy for success can best be described by way of a metaphor of travelling
on a journey. The very experience of travelling and overcoming challenges is
formative. I remember well the comments of a pupil about the redrafting process
within creative writing: “I learnt that mistaking is succeeding.”
Adapting and improving
The challenges we have faced include a quadrupling of the number of pupils on roll
over the last 30 years. We have handled major changes in the Ofsted framework,
REPORT CARD
YESOIDAY HATORAH SCHOOL
MANCHESTER
»Headteacher:
Dr Jonathan Yodaiken
»Founded in 1945
»Established as an academy in
2011
»Based in Prestwich, Greater
Manchester
»Type of school: Primary for
ages 3 to 11
»No. of pupils: 903
»No. of staff: 278
Yesoiday HaTorah
School Manchester
45YESOIDAY HATORAH SCHOOL MANCHESTER |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
»OFSTED QUOTES
You have created an
environment of care and
nurture that radiates
throughout the whole
school community. Pupils’
achievements at the expected
and higher standard are well
above that of pupils nationally.”
You have high expectations
and lead by example, ably
assisted by the assured,
enthusiastic leadership team.
Parents are amazed at how you
individually care about every
single child. This is impressive
in such a large school.”
the national curriculum and assessment
standards. We have never lost sight of
the raison d’être of our school: raising
aspirations and meeting the needs
of every child. In order to manage
change effectively, we have established
the vision, shared this vision with our
stakeholders and carefully constructed
teams to deliver the new initiative. We
have introduced change by setting mini
targets with reasonable timescales,
which has helped reduce resistance
and encourage engagement.
We have our own coaching champion,
who is highly trained as a coach
and counsellor. In addition, we have
trained the senior leadership team
in basic coaching skills, empowering
staff to be resilient and aspirational
and to engage in school life in a
vibrant and positive way. I believe that
this is the main reason why we have
been so successful in growing our
senior leadership team from our own
teaching staff. An additional benefit is
that staff turnover is very low.
Collaboration within school
and beyond
When I first became headteacher,
we had few links with other schools.
This changed drastically in 2007,
when I took a lead role in the Greater
Manchester Challenge programme.
Professor Mel Ainscow of Manchester
University described our work with a
predominantly Muslim school as “a
partnership which organically watered
the flowers, a gentle process and
crucially a thrifty one”.
Recently, we have collaborated with
schools in delivering assessments
without levels, Singapore maths, maths
mastery and writing moderation,
as well as several leadership and
management initiatives within the
alliance for learning at our strategic
partners, Altrincham Grammar School
for Girls. This collaboration has been
good for our school and has given us
the opportunity to help others.
We have also established teams in key
areas. These include literacy, numeracy,
personal development, cross curricular,
learning environment, several Jewish
studies subjects and British values. Each
team is set up with team leaders who
encourage group review and reflection
and have facilitated an incredible level
of staff engagement and enthusiasm.
Child-centred ethos and
practice
In order to meet the needs of pupils, we
have invested in many experts. These
include three speech therapists, a social
skills lead, two therapeutic play experts,
two dyslexia specialists and a Numicon
champion, all of whom work under
theguidance of our superb SENCO.
Our SEND intervention Chavazelet
programme enables pupils with high
needs to be part of our school. This
provision, housed within a special
classroom, is targeted at integrating
pupils with significant needs. Pupils are
engaged in educational activities, with
added focus on sensory integration and
social skills, in tandem with designated
literacy and numeracy lessons.
One of our therapists has set up a
state-of-the-art therapy room, in
which she uses her skills to provide
beautiful music and dance activities,
in tandem with supporting children’s Our pupils engrossed in
reading in our state-of-
the-art library
Our SEND
intervention
Chavazelet
programme
enables pupils
with high needs
to be part of our
school
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
44 | YESOIDAY HATORAH SCHOOL MANCHESTER
Headteacher
Dr Jonathan Yodaiken
Our warm and nurturing
nursery setting
Yesoiday HaTorah Academy School in Prestwich, Greater
Manchester, opened in 1945 as an independent school,
achieving state aid 52 years ago and academy status in
April 2011. From small beginnings, the school is now one of the
largest and most successful schools in Manchester, with over
900 pupils on roll and a five-form entry. Over the last decade,
the school’s results and Ofsted outcomes have been strong, but
this has not come without difficulties. Headteacher Dr Jonathan
Yodaiken has been responsible for turning the school around
and tells the
Review
more about this journey.
Helping others to succeed in education, be it schools or parents, is my passion,
which is why I am a local leader of education, the author of two books on
parenting and a valued consultant, sharing good practice and strategies with
colleagues across the country. I’ve also been a member of the Primary Headteachers
Reference Group for over eight years, which meets regularly in the DfE, reviewing
and discussing, with a group of successful headteachers, education, legislation and
issues pertaining to schools throughout the country.
My philosophy for success can best be described by way of a metaphor of travelling
on a journey. The very experience of travelling and overcoming challenges is
formative. I remember well the comments of a pupil about the redrafting process
within creative writing: “I learnt that mistaking is succeeding.”
Adapting and improving
The challenges we have faced include a quadrupling of the number of pupils on roll
over the last 30 years. We have handled major changes in the Ofsted framework,
REPORT CARD
YESOIDAY HATORAH SCHOOL
MANCHESTER
»Headteacher:
Dr Jonathan Yodaiken
»Founded in 1945
»Established as an academy in
2011
»Based in Prestwich, Greater
Manchester
»Type of school: Primary for
ages 3 to 11
»No. of pupils: 903
»No. of staff: 278
Yesoiday HaTorah
School Manchester
45YESOIDAY HATORAH SCHOOL MANCHESTER |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
»OFSTED QUOTES
You have created an
environment of care and
nurture that radiates
throughout the whole
school community. Pupils’
achievements at the expected
and higher standard are well
above that of pupils nationally.”
You have high expectations
and lead by example, ably
assisted by the assured,
enthusiastic leadership team.
Parents are amazed at how you
individually care about every
single child. This is impressive
in such a large school.”
the national curriculum and assessment
standards. We have never lost sight of
the raison d’être of our school: raising
aspirations and meeting the needs
of every child. In order to manage
change effectively, we have established
the vision, shared this vision with our
stakeholders and carefully constructed
teams to deliver the new initiative. We
have introduced change by setting mini
targets with reasonable timescales,
which has helped reduce resistance
and encourage engagement.
We have our own coaching champion,
who is highly trained as a coach
and counsellor. In addition, we have
trained the senior leadership team
in basic coaching skills, empowering
staff to be resilient and aspirational
and to engage in school life in a
vibrant and positive way. I believe that
this is the main reason why we have
been so successful in growing our
senior leadership team from our own
teaching staff. An additional benefit is
that staff turnover is very low.
Collaboration within school
and beyond
When I first became headteacher,
we had few links with other schools.
This changed drastically in 2007,
when I took a lead role in the Greater
Manchester Challenge programme.
Professor Mel Ainscow of Manchester
University described our work with a
predominantly Muslim school as “a
partnership which organically watered
the flowers, a gentle process and
crucially a thrifty one”.
Recently, we have collaborated with
schools in delivering assessments
without levels, Singapore maths, maths
mastery and writing moderation,
as well as several leadership and
management initiatives within the
alliance for learning at our strategic
partners, Altrincham Grammar School
for Girls. This collaboration has been
good for our school and has given us
the opportunity to help others.
We have also established teams in key
areas. These include literacy, numeracy,
personal development, cross curricular,
learning environment, several Jewish
studies subjects and British values. Each
team is set up with team leaders who
encourage group review and reflection
and have facilitated an incredible level
of staff engagement and enthusiasm.
Child-centred ethos and
practice
In order to meet the needs of pupils, we
have invested in many experts. These
include three speech therapists, a social
skills lead, two therapeutic play experts,
two dyslexia specialists and a Numicon
champion, all of whom work under
theguidance of our superb SENCO.
Our SEND intervention Chavazelet
programme enables pupils with high
needs to be part of our school. This
provision, housed within a special
classroom, is targeted at integrating
pupils with significant needs. Pupils are
engaged in educational activities, with
added focus on sensory integration and
social skills, in tandem with designated
literacy and numeracy lessons.
One of our therapists has set up a
state-of-the-art therapy room, in
which she uses her skills to provide
beautiful music and dance activities,
in tandem with supporting children’s Our pupils engrossed in
reading in our state-of-
the-art library
Our SEND
intervention
Chavazelet
programme
enables pupils
with high needs
to be part of our
school
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
46 | YESOIDAY HATORAH SCHOOL MANCHESTER
needs by way of therapeutic play.
These Shir V’zemer (Hebrew for song
and music) sessions culminate in an
end-of-year show attended by parents.
Every child can shine through singing,
dancing, delivering a speech, playing an
instrument or helping out with stage
and costume design. These sessions
have had a strong impact on children
emotionally, academically and socially,
as well as having a powerful effect on
executive functioning.
Curriculum enrichment
In all curriculum development,
we have identified our curriculum
targets and considered how best to
integrate these targets ubiquitously
throughout the school week. For
example, in writing, our pupils are on
a writing journey. This begins with an
overarching question, which is referred
to throughout the process of drafting
and redrafting. Pupils totally immerse
themselves in the topic. Each piece of
writing is moderated very carefully,
and outcomes are shared with pupils
as targets for further progress.
We have established our school library
as the epicentre of the school. It is a
state-of-the-art provision, with so many
choices for reading for enjoyment.
Pupils are further excited by the
reading clubs we hold in the library
and soon develop a love for reading.
In numeracy, we have embedded the
Singapore maths no-problem strategy.
This approach, coupled with our maths
mission work, has generated much
excitement and interest in problem-
solving. We are preparing the way for
the new generation of mathematicians
through our pupils embracing the
rigour of choosing several different
strategies to solve any one problem
and then identifying the most efficient
one. Our sensational science days
involve complete immersion in all
manner of science investigations over
three full days per term and generate
muchexcitement.
Character building
Albert Einstein described education
as “what remains after all else is
forgotten”. The values, good character
traits, respect and empathy that we
imbue in our pupils are arguably the
most important part of our educational
provision. This is why I have written
two books on the topic of engendering
good character traits in our children,
and it is also why we have regular
parenting workshops in school. One
of the character-building programmes
we use is called the Treasure Hunt
and focuses on the treasure within us,
which is just waiting to be unleashed.
We place a big emphasis on developing
the talents of our pupils through
talent shows, poetry competitions,
musical song and dance performances,
sports, and speaking opportunities.
As we strive for ever-greater success,
we will continue to promote unity
within diversity, respecting everyone,
including those who may be different.
We will
continue to
promote unity
within diversity,
respecting
everyone,
including those
who may be
different
»KODESH CURRICULUM
“Educate the child according to his way so that when he grows up, he will
not turn away from it.” These famous words of King Solomon serve as a
backdrop for the pioneering work that we are doing within our school.
There are a number of subjects in our Kodesh curriculum: Jewish history,
Jewish law (Dinim), Kodesh reading and Kodesh writing, Talmudical
studies, Jewish general knowledge, prayer, art and music, Bible stories,
and good-character-building (Middos) programmes. We have worked very
hard to deliver our Kodesh curriculum in a cross-curricular way, with many
attainment targets that appear in the national curriculum being met directly
within the Kodesh curriculum. Additionally, many targets that are not
directly covered – such as phonic awareness – are reinforced.
Our SLT: sharing a vision
for excellence
47ST JAMES CATHOLIC PRIMARY SCHOOL |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
Academically, we are one of the
highest-performing schools in
the North West
We have a reputation for our
outstanding commitment to
pupil development
Situated in the suburb of Orrell, Wigan, St James’ Catholic
Primary School has, under the leadership of Headteacher
Gary Hayes, adapted to the changing educational landscape
in order to further develop its reputation within the local area
and wider afield. Having just completed a journey to become a
full two-form entry school through major expansion works, Gary
tells
The Parliamentary Review
that the school is now equipped
with both buildings and an environment that is fit for purpose.
Despite being one of the most poorly-funded schools per pupil in the local
authority, we have an outstanding reputation for not only our academic standards
but also our commitment to the wider development of pupils. This is something
that we’re especially proud of.
Academically, the school is one of the highest-performing primary schools in not only
the local area but also the North West. While all attainment and progress measures
are positive, maths progress is a particular jewel in our crown – by that measure,
we have consistently ranked in the top two to three per cent of schools nationally.
Teaching and learning
Key to our success are effective teaching and learning strategies that allow all
pupils to make consistent progress as they move through the school.
Senior leaders set the tone by ensuring that we are focused on key strategies.
We work on the principle of undertaking central targets well and adopting them
consistently across the school, rather than automatically taking on every new
initiative that comes along.
REPORT CARD
ST JAMES CATHOLIC PRIMARY
SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Gary Hayes
»Founded in 1848
»Based in Orrell, Wigan,
Greater Manchester
»Type of school: Voluntary-
aided primary
»No. of students: 420
»The school is near the border
with West Lancashire
»www.osjschool.uk
St James Catholic
Primary School

www.yhs.org.uk

This article was sponsored by Yesoiday HaTorah School Manchester. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development